Squall (a quatern)

squall

She’s the squall that loves the dry-line,
begs him chase her from east to west.
With her stormy hips she teases,
draws his gaze, she’s working her spell.

He’s got swagger, keeps his cool–and
she’s the squall that loves the dry-line.
Blowing kisses, tossing her cape,
she invites him to come and dance.

Shaking moisture from her skirts, she
catches his eyes, flashing lightning.
She’s the squall that loves the dry-line–
wild, unstable–still he’s tempted.

This electric charge they share is
passion, stormy and explosive.
If you hear their cries, you’ll know her–
she’s the squall that loves the dry-line.

—–

POETIC FORM: QUATERN

16 lines broken up into 4 quatrains (or 4-line stanzas). Each line is comprised of 8 syllables. 1st line is the refrain (R). In the 2nd stanza, the refrain appears in the 2nd line; in the 3rd stanza, the 3rd line; in the 4th stanza, the 4th (and final) line. There are no rules for rhyming or iambics.

—–

FORM DIAGRAM:

1(R)
2
3
4

1
2(R)
3
4

1
2
3(R)
4

1
2
3
4(R)

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a work poem. For some folks, writing is work (great, huh?). For others, work is teaching, engineering, or delivering pizzas. Still others, dream of having work to help them pay the bills or go to all ages shows. Some don’t want work, don’t need work, and are glad to be free of the rat race. There are people who work out, work on problems, and well, I’ll let you work out how to handle your poem today.”

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Temptation (a palindrome)

wpid-2015-04-08-11.12.05.jpg.jpeg

Dare you!
Do you
— face to clouds —
brave storms
like I do?
Chase the thrill,
the adrenaline rush!
This lust’s my lure.
Will you surrender to
temptation?
To surrender, you will
lure my lusts?
This rush!
Adrenaline!
The thrill, the chase–
Do I like storms?
Brave clouds to face you?
Do YOU dare?

—–

POETIC FORM: PALINDROME

Use the same words in 1st half of the poem as the 2nd half, but reverse the order for 2nd half, and use a word in the middle as a bridge between 2 halves.

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a dare poem. This poem could be written as a dare to someone. It could make a daring proclamation. It could involve a dare that someone has accepted…or refused. In a way, each day of this challenge is a dare to write a poem. Are you ready for the challenge?”

Rain-Walking (a pantoum)

rainwalkers

Between the places where we watch the sky,
some days the distance seems a thousand miles.
In your downpour, you walk and so do I,
and when it rains, our longing turns to smiles.

So when the distance seems a thousand miles.
The rain that wets our skin may be the touch–
(See, when it rains our longing turns to smiles.)
–of tenderness from one we miss so much.

The rain that wets my skin may be your touch–
this rain that falls on me, will find you too.
The tenderness of love we miss so much–
in the next storm, this same rain falls on you.

This rain that falls on me will find you too.
Although I miss your touch I understand.
In the next storm, my rain will fall on you.
So close your eyes and feel me close at hand.

Although I miss your touch, I understand.
In your downpour you walk, and so do I.
I close my eyes and feel you close at hand,
between the places where we watch the sky.

—–

POETIC FORM: Pantoum

Poem consists of quatrains (4-line stanzas). No limit, but at least 2 stanzas. Each quatrain has an abab rhyme scheme. However, the poem can follow an abab/bcbc/cdcd/etc.rhyme scheme throughout. Lines 2 and 4 of each stanza become lines 1 and 3 of the next stanza. Ideally, lines 2 and 4 of the final stanza will become lines 1 and 3 of the opening stanza.

FORM DIAGRAM: (no limit on stanzas)

a1-
b1-
a2-
b2-

b1-
c1-
b2-
c2-

c1-
a2-
c2-
a1-

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

Two for Tuesday

Write a love poem. Yeah, I said a love poem, or, if you don’t like that option…Write an anti-love poem. I know there are some haters out there; go ahead and hate on love and/or love poems if that’s your thing. So if this is your first rodeo, here’s how the “Two for Tuesday” prompt works. You can choose one of the two options; choose both options; and/or blend the two together in some way. Just be sure to write a poem.”

Balsam Lane (a triolet)

norain

The forecast was for rain,
(though we’re still in the dry)
downtown at fifth and main.
The forecast was for rain.
I’m here at Balsam Lane—
no clouds are in the sky.
The forecast was for rain,
though we’re still in the dry.

—–

POETIC FORM: Triolet

An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a things-not-as-they-appear poem. Poetry is filled with metaphors, similes, symbols, and layered meanings, so this should be a softball prompt. If you’re struggling, look at your current surroundings, pick an object, and turn it into a metaphor for something. Or think of somebody in the real world (mail person, gas station attendant, etc.) and make up a secret double life for them. C’mon, you can do this.”

(A haiku)

image

tilt my face tasting
rain—a tomato
burst from your lips

—–

POETIC FORM: haiku

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a vegetable poem. I once wrote a poem titled “Tomatoes,” and that would count. If you want to write a poem about a specific vegetable, go for it. If you want to write a poem that just has a vegetable mixed in somewhere, go for it. If you want to praise or curse vegetables, go for it. If you want to play with the idea of vegetables, including a vegetable mental state, couch “potato,” and so on–well, you know, go for it.”

To the West (a villanelle poem)

watchstorm

 

I love the rain. You may have guessed.
When the warm wind begins to blow,
as the last storm tracks to the west,

desire pangs wake, cry in my chest,
as I watch these dark storm clouds go.
I prefer rain—you as my guest.

I confess I may be obsessed.
You’ve danced with me in rain—you know.
Before the storm tracks to the west,

our two bodies together pressed
will fight to stay, make time pass slow.
I love you, too. Rain may have guessed.

On the squall line, we built our nest.
though we must, we hate to let go,
Now this last storm tracks to the west

tangled in wet sheets, we’re refreshed.
storms will come back, with you, I know.
I love rain, and you, so I rest—
watching this storm track to the west.

—–

POETIC FORM:

The villanelle is a French form, consisting of five tercets and a quatrain with line lengths of 8-10 syllables. The first and third lines of the first stanza become refrains that repeat throughout the poem.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A(1)
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
a
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
a
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
A(2)

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a departure poem. Many people depart to school and/or work every day, and they depart on a plane, train, or automobile–some even walk or ride a bike. Of course, that’s keeping things rather physical; there are also emotional and psychological departures. You may even decide to make a departure from your normal writing style in tone or structure today.”

Spring Moon Consult

 

FullMoonPoetryApril2015

 

Sister moon is full, reclining
in the arms of lover, tree.
Beckons languid, at my window,
come sit, sky-clad, at her feet,

breathe my queries from a pure heart.
Answers she will speak to me,
in this chaos known as springtime,
while the winds of change run free.

“There’s no folly in a love with
roots dug deep in honesty.
Though a dry spell lays upon you–
rain will follow, you will see.”

 

fullmoontree

 

Weather Machine (a luc bat poem)

rainmachine
 —–
Place it here, in the dust;
give me room to adjust the dial.
Hold your breath, hope a while!
See those clouds? Hide your smile — they’re thin.
Press that button — again!
Feel that damp on your skin? Insane!
I told you, I’d make rain.
all it takes is a brain, and trust.
—–
POETIC FORM:
The luc bat is a Vietnamese poetic form that means “six-eight.” The poem consists of alternating lines of six and eight syllables. The rhyme scheme renews at the end of every eight-syllable line and rhymes on the sixth syllable of both lines.
—–
FORM DIAGRAM:
xxxxxA
xxxxxAxB
xxxxxB
xxxxxBxC
xxxxxC
xxxxxCxD
xxxxxD
xxxxxDxA
—–
POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:
“For today’s prompt, write a machine poem. A machine could be a car or a robot, obviously, but simple machines include levers, pulleys, and screws. There’s also “machine learning” and “deus ex machina.” But there are many other ways to come at this prompt as well.”

Dreaming Awake (a somonka poem)

bedrain

I woke to the rain
lonely in the bed we share.
Thunder asked questions
as I lay dreaming, awake.
Was it raining for you, too?
I’ll share a secret:
it rains now, in all my dreams
I find you there, too–
wrapped in sheets where storms are made,
rain soaked and smiling with me.
—–
POETIC FORM:
The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but it is possible to have a poet take on two personas. Click here for a refresher on the tanka.
POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:
“For today’s prompt, write a secret poem. The poem itself could be a secret, or it could be about keeping secrets or, I suppose, not keeping them. Or maybe it’s about a top secret project, or the poem is a riddle with some sort of secret meaning. Or, well, I’ll let you figure out how best to poem secretively.”

When It Rains (a rondel poem)

wpid-2015-04-01-10.28.41.jpg.jpeg

You take my hand, I can’t resist.
We find our haven in the storm.
I know these clouds, the way they form,
the wind that makes my passions twist.

I knew you the first time we kissed.
The sun was hot; your lips were warm.
You took my hand, could not resist.
We found our haven in the storm.

I hope for rain, though drought persists.
Still I rebel, will not conform
to rules that keep us from the storm.
I dreamed a place where we can tryst.
Come take me now, we can’t resist.

—–
POETIC FORM: Rondel
A French form, similar to the rondeau and the triolet, consisting of 13 eight-syllable lines in three stanzas.
Rhyme scheme = ABba/abAB/abbaA
—–
POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:
“For today’s prompt, write a resistance poem. There are many forms of resistance, including militant resistance, resistance to new ideas, the resistance in exercise, and maybe even a little resistance to starting a new project. I hope you don’t resist the urge to write a poem today.”