The F Word (a remixing poem – tanka)

surprisegirl

Certainly the word
burns — a bawdy vulgar imp:
part of a couplet,
there in a poem, striking
the senses as “fucking” does.

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem (A Tanka)

A Japanese form, tanka would be a 5-line, 5-7-5-7-7 syllable poem, or a 5-line poem with 3 short lines (lines 2, 4, 5) and 2 very short lines (lines 1 and 3). While imagery is important in tanka, the form is a little more conversational than haiku. It allows for the use of poetic devices such as metaphor and personification.
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PROMPT:

To earn the Pinch an Inch badge, begin with a source text of your choice and a ruler. Mark off a column of text one vertical inch wide down one or more pages — you might choose, for example, to use an inch down the center of your page, or along the page’s left or right margin. Craft your poem using only words located within your vertical column inch(es).
If you decide to use multiple pages, locate your vertical column inch in the same location on each page (i.e. all center columns, all right margin columns, etc).
Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE TEXT: The F Word – edited by Jesse Sheidlower

Storm-Tossed (a 108 word poem)

womanboat

The moon has been pushing,
tugging my tides, of late.
My ship is tossed by a wild,
mercurial sea.

I relish these days, the fervor
and elation, but my soul longs
for the harbor that is you.

I’ve been watching brooding skies
checking charts and maps
–hoping to find my way
back to where you are.

Do you perhaps stand
at the shoreline, shining
a beacon to light
the way?

When I appear over the
the stormy horizon–
cast me a line?
Tow me to shore?

Gather me into your arms
— into your body?
Will you give me shelter,
and show me what
loving you can be?

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PROMPT:

108 Word Poem – Poetry challenge, inspired by The Quiet World, by Jeffrey McDaniel http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179259 – If you could only write 108 words to your lover… (167 less 59) write a poem with exactly 108 words.

Growl

red4BWR
There is a growl that lives within
the dark cave of his throat.
His eyes contain a beacon fire
against the black, I note.

While standing in the moonlight here
back pressed against a tree–
I watch him lick his twitching lips
as he is watching me.

I’m drawn like moths to amber flame
to his hungry restraint.
For, though he’s quite the gentleman,
I’ll wager he’s no saint.

I’ll whisper softly, laugh aloud
I’ll taunt him with my eyes–
eventually he’ll drop his guard.
I’ll get past his disguise.

You see, it’s that low growl I seek–
the hunt, the wolf, the prey.
I want his fire, his energy–
the lust he holds at bay.

I Do Not Know (a remixing poem – cento)

manwomanmeet

As a kid, I would count backwards
from ten and imagine at one,
patience and love agreed
to meet at a set time and place,
beneath the questions you
had never asked.

His voice in this room,
her eyes a closed book—
“I barely know you,” she says,
voice heavy with sleep.
“I don’t know,
no one truly knows,
who they are,” he sighs.

The glass bottle does
anything and everything,
always seeking.
Dawn turns to day —
it happens like this:

One day you meet someone,
and for some the answer is
“Yes, always yes! I cannot
deny you anything!

You — do you remember
our first day? The fog lifted
and all around us,
I  saw a dream.
We said hello at half past one.

It was one of those nights
that you are not altogether
sure, really. I did not know —
perhaps I never loved enough.
As the earth began spinning
faster and faster, we floated.

“Be careful about giving your
heart too quickly,” I was told.
“Love a girl who writes.”

There is a tide that rolls away,
like time suspended —
the path from you extending.
For all the time I’ve known you,
in a sea of strangers,
you were the one —

A midnight scribble
stretching out from here to then,
You were faultless.
Do you see?
You may not know.
You are the moment before
the sun sinks into the horizon.

The timing is irrelevant when
two people are meant for each other.
It’s your love I once surrendered.
Do you remember
what you once said to me?

“When two souls fall in love,
there is nothing else
but the yearning—
sorrow tells stories.”
I wonder if there will be a morning
when you’ll wake up missing.

Do you know that feeling—
when it’s like you’ve lost something?
“I don’t know what to say,” he said.
“There are people I will never know—
I am somebody else’s story.”

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem

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PROMPT:
FirstInLine
To earn the First in Line badge, choose a published collection of poems by a single poet. Copy down the first line of each poem in the collection. Craft a poem using select lines from your list — you must keep the wording of the original lines intact, but may make alterations to elements like line breaks, punctuation and capitalization. The challenge with this form (often called a cento) is to use another poet’s lines to create a piece that sounds like it’s from YOUR voice.
For an example of a poem created using the first lines of other texts, check out Alex MacDonald’s “Free Verse Cento”:http://campus.poetryschool.com/free-verse-cento/
Credit your source collection and specific poems excerpted at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
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SOURCE TEXT: Lullabies by Lang Leav

What Do You See? (a remixing poem)

gypsy
Do you see a future
as a medium?
I don’t know, do you?
What does that mean to you?

You don’t know what
tomorrow’s going to be like?
Is that what you mean?
If nobody heard it, did it happen?

It’s the effect?
So that was it?
Getting on the plane?
Can you imagine the ride west?

Do you remember?
What were your thoughts
when you saw him?
And what is it he said?

“What the fuck?”
Well, why not?
What am I complaining about?
I walked into that one, didn’t I?

Is that in your mind?
How will history remember?
And why should they?
What would you do?

Do you think we were surprised,
to find that the American Dream
was a nightclub, that had burned
down five years earlier?

A happy ending?
Was it there for people to find?

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem
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PROMPT:
 Interrogator
To earn the Interrogator badge, begin by selecting a source text of your choice. Copy down all of the questions it contains. Create a poem that’s a series of questions from the list you excerpted. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
  • April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
  • Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
  • Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
  • Poets choose their own source text.
  • For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
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SOURCE TEXT: 
Writing on the Wall – an Interview with Hunter S. Thompson – The Atlantic Online (http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/unbound/graffiti/hunter.htm)

The Declaration (a remixing poem)

mirror

There comes a time
we must stand
before the mirror
look into our tired eyes

creative, independent
our true selves
destined for greatness
human kindness

each of us consent
our desires unlimited
freedom enslaving us
to popular boredom

when will we be ready
to ask such questions
we race into mazes
do we live as mice?

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem
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PROMPT:
PickNMix
To earn the Pick & Mix badge, begin by selecting a source text of your choice.  Browse through a selection of your text, copying down words and phrases that interest you. Craft a poem using only words you found in the text, arranging them in any order you choose. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
  • April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
  • Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
  • Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
  • Poets choose their own source text.
  • For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
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SOURCE TEXT:  The Motivation Manifesto – Brendon Burchard

Full Moon Bathing

image

Mother of the night calls
and I step into the trees.
The cloak of my cares
slips, in a fall of silk
from my shoulders and
bare, I sink into the arms
of deep, warm water.

We whisper, as sisters do,
of hopes and change,
the extravagance
of the universe.
I confess the ache of
my longing for you,
and she reminds me
the journey is the ‘this’.

Sleep pulls me, protesting,
from her watery feet,
so she fills my hands
with blessings —
courage, clarity, love.

Bury the Weather Vane

conjure

When you attempt to
conjure a weatherman,
be sure to wear stormy grey.
Kick off both of your shoes.
Walk for hours in the rain.
Bury the weather vane
below your bedroom window,
gather a fistful of feathers,
and slowly chant his name.
Dance boldly with the moon,
when she’s full and flirts
from behind a veil of clouds
which you have stirred
widdershins into your third
cup of black, sweet coffee
–he will come riding the wind
of your incantation.

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Bury the (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Some possible titles include: “Bury the Hatchet,” “Bury the Body,” “Bury the Past,” “Bury the Hate,” and “Bury the Acorns.”