Being Rooted (an out-and-about poem)

tree

I think you get
prepared
for landings.

I was disappearing —
surrounded by love,
held by love,
but having so small
an imagination
about that word.

Allow people
to enter you
and they change
you — I longed
to know what was
going on
inside of people.

Through words
and language,
I knew
my survival
was there–

in the body
of the world
i fell in love
with a tree
a contemplative
(in the temple)
practice

using words
as something
generative
to reassemble
the tissues
of my soul

transcendence
comes from
being rooted,
when someplace
enters you–

I think you get
prepared,
for the moment.

—–

POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

—–

PROMPT:

Interloper

To earn the “Interloper” badge, look in your local print or online newspaper for open meetings, lectures or other talks happening in your town — the more specialized and unfamiliar to you, the better. Need help finding an event? Try Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.com/) or your local Craigslist’s “Events” section for additional leads (e.g. Washington, DC, example: http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/search/eve) Sit in the audience and scribble down words and phrases you hear during the event. Turn your notes into a found poem and post it on the site. Cite your speaker(s)’ name(s), talk title [if applicable], location and date at the bottom of your poem.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: Krista Tippett – On Being Podcast – A second Wind in Life: Inhabiting the Body After Cancer – a conversation with Eve Ensler

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