When You Feel Stuck (a chance operation poem)

stuck-in-mud

this change waited
feeling responsibility
feeling quicksand
stuck

waited forever felt
the pull possible
nothing
stuck

within the need born
destiny here, while
conditions procrastinate
stuck

what fixed future —
we feeling spiritual
feeling truly
stuck

wept change
when someone
felt nothing
you stuck

that feeling — change
with response
overwhelming responsibility
it stuck

whatever the changing
reality
(circumstances forever
feeling pull)
encounters you

when they change
with nearly nothing
surprisingly —
yourself

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POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

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PROMPT:

 

 

SpellingBee

 

To earn the “Spelling B” badge, you’ll need your source text and a “seed” phrase, Your seed phrase is a sentence or fragment that contains at least 20 characters and which can be related or not to your source. For instance, if your source text is a book on baseball, you might choose “Take me out to the ballgame” as your seed phrase. If your source text is on the Beatles, you might choose, “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Visit the Diastic Poem Generator at http://www.languageisavirus.com/diastic-poem-generator.html. Enter your seed phrase and source text in the corresponding boxes, then click “Generate.” The program will create a “spell-through” of your text. Using the “take me out to the ballgame” example, the program will search through your text for the first word that has T in the first position (it might be a word like “the,” “travel,” or “true”) and add it to your word list. Next, it searches for a word that has “a” in the second position (e.g. “cap,” “batboy,” “game”), and so on, until it reaches the end of your seed text. Add the results to your word bank, and keep clicking “Generate” to add additional iterations. For a more experimental text, keep the resulting text intact. Otherwise, remove text to create your poem — but try to keep the words in order. Post your poem to the site, along with citations for your source text and seed phrase.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: 10 Powerful Quotes to Read When We’re Feeling Stuck by Becky Volimer on Elephant Journal
SEED PHRASE: “When We’re Feeling Stuck”
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A Duck in Socks (a chance operation poem)

socks

———-
Tricks come easy for a duck in socks —
to battle these beetles and make tick tocks.
A bottle for cheese can break these clocks.
Won’t you be quick sir, and choose a box?
My mouth bends and I blubber for a minute.
A sock can be easy, when to sew these isn’t.
I come in quick with new socks to get
you to sew for me in a sock battle. Get it?
These bricks make breaks in three-trick goo
and a broom and a box can’t stop what you do.
Look sir, here’s a hose, and a sock on Sue.
Will you call Mr. Knox to sew for you?
My socks are easy for some to be in.
Joe isn’t slow — this luck’s for Ben.
Socks can get mixed, and stop tricks, when
you get a poodle and a fox duddled in.
Sue’s socks are slick and Joe sews some.
When a poodle and a duck sew, now paddles come.
A band breaks slow, when the tweetle socks come.
Won’t you have a minute now, to make Ben some?
I say very slow, look sir, that’s my sock.
Will you sew it quick, and get my box?
Will you be quick when the clocks tick tock?
My poodle can’t battle with a quick-trick fox.
—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

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PROMPT:

DialedIn

To earn the “Dialed In” badge, start by choosing a phone number — your own, one from a business, or one you make up. Write out the full number (including any area codes) as a series of digits without dashes or parentheses. Decide what your numbers will correspond to in your text – a word choice, sentence choice or page choice to your source text. For instance, if your first number is two (2), you could choose to grab the second word on a page, the second sentence on a page, or the second page in the book. Do this for each digit in the phone number. You can cycle through the phone number series multiple times if necessary to generate enough text for your poem. Post your completed poem to the site, and add a citation for your source text. Do not post the phone number you used, out of privacy considerations.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss

http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/dreeves/Fox-In-Socks.txt

Word List:

a an and band battle be beetle beetles Ben bends Bim’s blubber bottle box breaks bricks brings broom call can can’t cheese choose clocks come comes do duck duddled easy for fox get goes goo grows have here’s hose I in is isn’t Joe Knox lakes like look lots luck’s make minute mixed mouth Mr. my new now on paddles play poodle quick say sew sews sir slick slow sneeze socks some stop Sue Sue’s that’s their these they this three tick to tocks too trick tricks tweetle very what when where whose with won’t you

Along the Galaxy’s Edge

venusjupiter

My toes rooted
in the earth
my head so high
in the night sky
moonlight scatters
diamonds in my hair

your voice whispers
at my shoulder,
your breath against
my ear, we two are
voyeurs, as Venus
and Jupiter dance

This magic does not
scare you; you don’t
shrug or roll your eyes
gazing with me into
eternities — we are ageless

children of the universe
your words are sweet
as summer ice cream
you make me believe this
walk along the galaxy’ edge
is a highlight of your day

Brillig Nonsense (a chance operation poem)

jabberwocky1

jabberwocky1 (2)

Jabberwocky2

 

Chortled borogroves,
Jabberwock galumphing
Jabberwock manxome

arms snicker through the outgrabe
whiffling, “Beware! ” Did wabe were blade
borogroves, long frabjous, went raths.

That bandersnatch back
—————–Callooh Tumtum
His sought stood brillig
————— Jabberwock

Mimsy outgrabe mome, dead Jubjub
and slain frumious two — that head with sword.
Toves burbled, did.

‘Twas all came and went
were through claws
and he gimble
——-— mimsy, slithy —
and the snack gimble.
‘Twas come uffish toves
———–catch rested time.

Callay and vorpal, through brillig thought,
stood tulgey, and took, and slithy mome.
Hand thou flame, and jaws the thought!

He beamish wood, with the vorpal and eyes,
gyre and wabe awhile all raths
Boy, beware to shun the gyre!

So by the came of he the one
My, my — bite one
———–— the joy!

And the to bird tree left his day.
In foe, the in, the hast, the O
————————My son.

 

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POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

ShakeItUp

 

To earn the “Shake It Up” badge, follow the mandate ofTristanTzara in “How to MakeaDadaist Poem” (http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/tzara.html) to create a cut-up poem. Start by  cutting out desired words or phrases from a source text, and put them in a paper bag or other container. Shake the container to mix up the words, then pull them out one by one. Place them on the table in the order you draw them to create your poem — no removing or reordering words permitted. Post your poem — or a picture of your cut-up if possible — on the site, along with a source text citation.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll