When You Feel Stuck (a chance operation poem)

stuck-in-mud

this change waited
feeling responsibility
feeling quicksand
stuck

waited forever felt
the pull possible
nothing
stuck

within the need born
destiny here, while
conditions procrastinate
stuck

what fixed future —
we feeling spiritual
feeling truly
stuck

wept change
when someone
felt nothing
you stuck

that feeling — change
with response
overwhelming responsibility
it stuck

whatever the changing
reality
(circumstances forever
feeling pull)
encounters you

when they change
with nearly nothing
surprisingly —
yourself

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

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PROMPT:

 

 

SpellingBee

 

To earn the “Spelling B” badge, you’ll need your source text and a “seed” phrase, Your seed phrase is a sentence or fragment that contains at least 20 characters and which can be related or not to your source. For instance, if your source text is a book on baseball, you might choose “Take me out to the ballgame” as your seed phrase. If your source text is on the Beatles, you might choose, “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Visit the Diastic Poem Generator at http://www.languageisavirus.com/diastic-poem-generator.html. Enter your seed phrase and source text in the corresponding boxes, then click “Generate.” The program will create a “spell-through” of your text. Using the “take me out to the ballgame” example, the program will search through your text for the first word that has T in the first position (it might be a word like “the,” “travel,” or “true”) and add it to your word list. Next, it searches for a word that has “a” in the second position (e.g. “cap,” “batboy,” “game”), and so on, until it reaches the end of your seed text. Add the results to your word bank, and keep clicking “Generate” to add additional iterations. For a more experimental text, keep the resulting text intact. Otherwise, remove text to create your poem — but try to keep the words in order. Post your poem to the site, along with citations for your source text and seed phrase.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: 10 Powerful Quotes to Read When We’re Feeling Stuck by Becky Volimer on Elephant Journal
SEED PHRASE: “When We’re Feeling Stuck”

Daughter (a chance operation poem)

motherdaughter

My compassionate daughter:
while tonight we feel this pain,
we touch today in affection.
We feel wanted, in pragmatism.

My empath daughter:
In partnerships, remove even this.
Be this affection, However we feel.
Today, we wanted them, too.
Tonight, even we feel lives.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

RollTheDice

To earn the “Roll the Dice” badge, start with multiple dice and your source text. You can use regular six-sided dice, or ones with more sides (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dice#Non-cubic). Assign each line on your source text page a number — you can work consecutively (first line = 1, second line = 2), in reverse order (last line = 1, etc) or in any order you choose. Roll the dice — whatever line corresponds to the number that came up gets added to your word bank. Continue rolling the dice until you have a big enough word bank to craft a poem. For an extra challenge, retain the full original lines in your finished piece. Post your completed poem to the site, accompanied by your source text citation.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

How to Love and Empath by Rebecca Lammersen on Elephant Journal

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/01/how-to-love-an-empath/

WORD LIST:

my, even, I, to, or, today, this, pain, daughter, compassionate, we, however, remove, touch, them, while, and, feel, pragmatism, too, tonight, in, wanted, empath, partnerships, feels, I, be, affection, if, lives

You’re the Only North (a conceptual poem)

couplefight

Call back time, Let felicity fly.
Blanket the bed, and kiss goodbye.

I was terribly lost, crossed and dark.
You’re the only north I would follow.

Fight back, bring on the break,
and blow to bits.

Dear, I was terribly crossed and dark.
But you’re the north I follow this far.

Keep an eye on hope,
Lest I blink and get nothing to say.

‘Cause you’re the blinding light
the saving grace of the saving grace.

God, I was lost and dark, dear.
You’re only this far… I would follow.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

BestLaidPlan

To earn the “Best Laid Plan” badge, approach a text with a plan to remove something. Think beyond just a single word and instead consider removing references to a subject or emotion, actions taken by certain characters, colors, etc. Whatever you choose, apply your approach and, keeping as much of the remaining text intact as possible, create your poem from results. Post your poem to the site, include a citation for your source text, as well as a note on your approach.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: “Galaxies” by Owl City
(www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/owlcity/galaxies.html)

The Tango of Being (a conceptual poem)

tangoguitar

This is the opening human,
and creative philosophy–
Music moves us like no other.

This is being.

This sustains a creative tension–
the spiritual background of childhood–
raised in bucolic place,
dirt roads insects gardens.
Wonderful trees passed away
when I was young.

By the time I was eleven
I went into a spiritual crisis:
From early life you grew up listening.
My father would stop shaving
to finish a phrase of the tango.
I was an advocate of identity
felt it important to show who I am.

Tango was going to come
into my life, I just had to wait.
Tango taps into such passion:
you have to have lived.

I decided to explore.
This is being.

Tango will say a little more
about that root
of your identity, I think–
articulate things–
use of silence and space.
You heard the silence.
It’s all those spaces you know.

I love that moment when
you’re suspended–
silence
–between the space
of two notes.
something that comes
from within.

You don’t really know who
is doing it, but it is
connection beyond
understanding.

It’s really hard to talk
about the moment I am,
creating and confronted with
whatever comes out of my hands.
It’s something
that connects with my heart.
To make that leap, we don’t
always have access.

Being, being
continues in a moment.
This is being.

Music becomes
a part of the fabric,
something that connects
with the heartbeat, has power
to steer your emotions–
has power to transform you.

Music does this.
This is being.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

QuietOnSet

 

To earn the “Quiet on Set” badge, choose a television program, podcast, or movie of at least 30 minutes in length. Press play and start transcribing what you hear — no pressing pause, turning on subtitles or referencing a script allowed! You won’t be able to keep up, and that’s the point. When completed, create a poem out of your transcribed words. You can delete — but not reorder — your transcribed text. Post your poem to the site, and include a citation for your source media.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

On Being Podcast with Krista Tippett – Gustavo Santaolalla – How Movie Music Moves Us

Time Out (a conceptual poem)

cornertime (2)

 

if our lives have been a whirlwind
if we had the best of intentions
if our heads and hearts did finally match up
if we were finally in a place
(where we didn’t need to convince ourselves)
if we were able to just let go
if our decisions make sense or not
if we all simply received a time out

now
now it’s crucial for us to sit
now take a deep breath
now about time-lines or about keeping pace
now we are making the right choice
now exactly what we want and need
now is the time when it all comes together

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

XY

 

To earn the “X:Y” badge, choose a syntactical relationship between words within a given text — look for patterns in how words are joined by punctuation or conjunctions, or how sentences are structured. Examples of syntactical relationships: “wine and cheese,” “man and wife,” “fear and loathing”, “this or that,” “him or me,” “wine or beer”, “The stove was hot.” “The room was silent.” “The table was dusty.”
“the wind blowing,” “the birds chirping,” “the mower whirring”, Choose a syntactical pattern, and go through your source text, making a list of all phrases and fragments that fit the pattern. Create a poem from your list. Example: Seth Abramson’s “Wii” (BOAAT): http://www.boaatpress.com/seth-abramson#wii Post your poem on the site, along with a citation of your source text.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2015/06/mercury-retrograde-is-over-now-what/

A Rock ‘n’ Roll Love (a conceptual poem)

rocknroll

Love’s energy derives not
from the variable tension
between man and woman
but from the variety of rhythmic
patterns within the man,
the different patterns
playing off the steady beat
of the repeated phrase.

Both loves depend,
as all loves do,
on the interplay of what
changes with what stays
the same — the simultaneous
creation and disruption of pattern.

But the differences ought to feel
as prominent as the similarities:
everything about
the fluctuating relationship
of woman and man in free sex
applies equally well to blank sex.

Attention to the man tends to
undermine a narrow preference
for one or another form of love,
for if you can hear what
man is doing to your experience
of the woman in a free-sex love,
then you can hear what man
is doing in a metered love.

The earliest surviving love
in the Western tradition
is organized in men.
Tellingly, it was not always
written down in men,
a fact that reminds us
that man is ultimately
a sonic rather than a visual
element of love.

As love began to be written
in vernacular languages,
the addition of rock ‘n’ roll
to the man seemed
to many people a barbarity.

When Milton was writing
Paradise Lost in blank sex,
the deletion of rock ‘n’ roll
from man seemed to some

people equally barbarous.
What does the addition
of rock ‘n’ roll do to
our sense of the man’s
relationship to woman?

In what way does rock ‘n’ roll
alert us to the work
that all men, rock ‘n’ rolled
or un-rock ‘n’ rolled, metered
or un-metered, end-stopped
or enjambed are performing
in relation to woman?

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

SubTexter

 

To earn the “Substitute Texter” badge, choose a source text where key terms reappear frequently throughout it. Books on a particular subject (e.g., whaling, basketball, the Civil War) lend themselves easily to this prompts, as do textbooks, medical journals, etc. Fiction is harder, but we welcome you to challenge yourself! Choose 1-5 of these recurring terms. For instance, in a source text about chess, you might choose the words “pawn” and “board.” Next, for each word you’ve chosen, select a replacement word. In the example above, you might choose to replace “pawn” with “woman” and “board” with “home.” Substitute the replacement  word(s) on your list each time the original term(s) appear(s) in the text.  Create a poem from the results, keeping editing and authorial intervention to a minimum. Post your poem on the site, along with a source text citation and a note on your seed and replacement words.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: The Art of the Poetic Line by James Longenbach – pp. 18-19

Seed Words and Replacements:
poem – love
line – man
syntax – woman
verse – sex
rhyme – rock ‘n’ roll

Being Rooted (an out-and-about poem)

tree

I think you get
prepared
for landings.

I was disappearing —
surrounded by love,
held by love,
but having so small
an imagination
about that word.

Allow people
to enter you
and they change
you — I longed
to know what was
going on
inside of people.

Through words
and language,
I knew
my survival
was there–

in the body
of the world
i fell in love
with a tree
a contemplative
(in the temple)
practice

using words
as something
generative
to reassemble
the tissues
of my soul

transcendence
comes from
being rooted,
when someplace
enters you–

I think you get
prepared,
for the moment.

—–

POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:

Interloper

To earn the “Interloper” badge, look in your local print or online newspaper for open meetings, lectures or other talks happening in your town — the more specialized and unfamiliar to you, the better. Need help finding an event? Try Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.com/) or your local Craigslist’s “Events” section for additional leads (e.g. Washington, DC, example: http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/search/eve) Sit in the audience and scribble down words and phrases you hear during the event. Turn your notes into a found poem and post it on the site. Cite your speaker(s)’ name(s), talk title [if applicable], location and date at the bottom of your poem.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: Krista Tippett – On Being Podcast – A second Wind in Life: Inhabiting the Body After Cancer – a conversation with Eve Ensler

Cherry Bomb (an out-and-about poem)

cherry street hideaway

a favorite
dotted blue
scoop dress

filled to
half- hide
heaping hills

tossed over a bed
made this farmer’s
head shake

melted this
frozen heart

made red
cherry bomb
magic

—–

POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

—–

OrdersUp

To earn the “Order’s Up” badge, visit your local restaurant, bar or coffee shop and snag a copy of the menu. Write a poem using only words and phrases found on the menu. Get a picture of yourself taken sitting in the location to post alongside your poem (selfies allowed for the less intrepid). Cite your restaurant, bar or coffee shop name and location at the bottom of your post.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: The Hideaway (Hideaway Pizza), Cherry Street, Tulsa, OK

He Did (an erasure poem)

He Did (a redacted poem)

It is a Friday,
three days after I go straight–
and I don’t know who will
walk up the street to
see the poets these days.

I go on, and he
doesn’t even look up.
I get a little ink,
but I don’t go to sleep.

I just stroll into the lane
and ask where
I came from,
in the heat.

I am sweating
and thinking of
leaning on John,
while he whispered.

He stopped.

-Pen Connor 2015

—–

POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

—–

PROMPT:

Redacted

To earn the “Redacted” badge, visit http://www.erasures.org and follow the directions to drag the blackout icon to your tool bar. From there, navigate to a website or other source text. Click on the blackout icon to activate the tool, then use your mouse to highlight words on the screen. As you highlight sections and release your mouse, you will see a black bar appear over them, digitally blacking them out. Leave only the words that comprise your poem exposed. Take a screenshot(s) of your finished product and post it to the site. To learn how to take a screenshot based on your operating system, visithttp://www.take-a-screenshot.org/. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE TEXT:

The Poetry Foundation (http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171368)
Frank O’Hara, “The Day Lady Died” from Lunch Poems. Copyright © 1964 by Frank O’Hara. Reprinted (on the Poetry Foundation site) with the permission of City Lights Books.
Source: The Collected Poems of Frank O’Hara (1995)

The Storm (a remixing poem)

we in the rain

He touched her –rain perfume
–her flesh white, enveloping,
a soothing rhythm about her,
hair disheveled, drowsy.

Touching his passion she stood;
he remembered nothing–
an entrance made arms,
mouth– steaming her throat.

His heart she clasped.
His hand stroked, playing–
firm bosom, like time in rain,
her hair back, sensuous.

And she — stiflingly defenselessness
the mystery he had lost,
broken by quiet that threatened,
eyes — still white lightning.

Passionate creature, open
her desire flame red —
would retreating seem a passing
cloud or a cyclone, breathless?

Dazed he dared look away
nervously flung himself before her
obscuring the view, did not heed
eyes so inviting, without guile.

Crashing torrents, mysterious, at
the borderland of ecstasy, inviting.
If she hands hope, in quivering lips–
now he looked — liquid blue eyes.

Releasing him and herself to
her birthright, he kissed–
The thunder was his, and she–
his! A storm, encircled.

Infatuation and desire aroused!
The distant rain filled all,
kissed her, He tasted
laugh of delight, upon her lips:
revelation– knowing her!

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem

—–

PROMPT:
Blender

To earn the Blender badge, choose either a source text that already exists in digital form, or a printed text that you’re willing to type out. Next, navigate to The Text-Mixing Desk at The Lazarus Corporation (http://www.lazaruscorporation.co.uk/cutup/text-mixing-desk), paste your text, adjust the controls and click “Start the Mix!”
Copy down the result exactly as it comes out of the Text Mixing Desk. Repeat the mixing process with additional sections of text if you want a longer language bank to work with.
Craft your poem from the results using words IN THE ORDER they appear in the original. You may delete words but not reorder them.
Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE TEXT: The Storm – a short story by Kate Chopin