Drunk on Rhyme (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

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Urban bourbon can you taste it,
how the rhyme slips right off your tongue
— like you’re happy and feeling young? Can you giggle at your own wit?

Chortle like you really get it?
It’s an inside joke come unstrung.
Urban bourbon –can you shout it?
Can you sing it like it’s unsung?

Wriggle like you’re having a fit!
Laugh out loud like bells just rung!
Who cares if they think you’re unstrung?
It’s a riot, you must admit!
Urban bourbon — can you feel it?

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#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #7:

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Urban (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Urban Cowboy,” “Urban Warfare,” “Urban Daydreams,” “Urban Living,” and so on.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-7

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POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

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AUDIO FILE:

Listen to Drunk on Rhyme (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem) by Penelope Connor #np on #SoundCloud

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Sleepy – (Junk Mail) a #NaPoMo #IMPROMPTU poem

sleepywoman

Toves don’t know about wabe
but when borogroves wake up
in the momeraths, my Jabberwock
are totally unable to open fully.

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JUNK MAIL SOURCE:

Hi Penelope…

I don’t know about you but when I wake up in the morning my eyes are totally unable to open fully.  It didn’t use to be that way but now that I am older some things just don’t work as well as they used to.  Know what I mean?

But this has been a blessing in disguise for me and whether you are the same or not, the lessons I learned from it has been a source of motivation for me and will, for sure and for certain, be one for you.

These lessons can be summarized in the 3 questions I ask myself every day…

SECOND SOURCE: Jabberwockey – by Lewis Carroll
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#NaPoMo INFO:

Found Poetry Review (FPR) Challenge – IMPROMPTU #2 – Guest Poet Collier Nogues offered a “Junk Mail” prompt. Check Out the Post here:

http://www.foundpoetryreview.com/blog/impromptu-2-collier-nogues/

 

DAY 2 – Collier Nogues

You can start with any piece of junk mail or advertising, or any legal document or bureaucratic form (it’s tax time!).

  1. Choose a few sentences.
  2.  Remove the nouns.
  3. Replace them with, words from a poem you’ve abandoned, words from one or more poems you love (by anyone, yourself included), or any other source that works.
  4.  From there, work what you’ve got into a poem.
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AUDIO FILE:

Foolish – a Rondeau

(with a bit of nonce* in the style of Lewis Carroll)

 

poetryinjar

 

You may find me mad and foolish —
my head in a sky full of stars,
hiding poems in socks and jars.
Do you think that’s gimb and trulish?

Of course I learned from monks prulish,
to tell tall-tales and steal memoirs.
That may well sound cruel and foolish,
make your head spin, your eyes see stars —

Are you feeling ill and mookish?
Yes, I stack books in damp bazaars,
and my methods won’t sell cigars —
so your judgment may be roufish.
Still, I like me odd and foolish!


*nonce (näns/) – adjective
  1. (of a word or expression) coined for or used on one occasion.

    “a nonce usage”


 

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#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #1:

For today’s prompt, write a foolish poem. It’s April Fool’s Day, after all. Let’s loosen up today with a poem in which we’re fools, others are fools, or there’s some kind of prank or tomfoolery happening. Fool around with it a while. http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-1

 

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POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

 

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AUDIO FILE:

A Duck in Socks (a chance operation poem)

socks

———-
Tricks come easy for a duck in socks —
to battle these beetles and make tick tocks.
A bottle for cheese can break these clocks.
Won’t you be quick sir, and choose a box?
My mouth bends and I blubber for a minute.
A sock can be easy, when to sew these isn’t.
I come in quick with new socks to get
you to sew for me in a sock battle. Get it?
These bricks make breaks in three-trick goo
and a broom and a box can’t stop what you do.
Look sir, here’s a hose, and a sock on Sue.
Will you call Mr. Knox to sew for you?
My socks are easy for some to be in.
Joe isn’t slow — this luck’s for Ben.
Socks can get mixed, and stop tricks, when
you get a poodle and a fox duddled in.
Sue’s socks are slick and Joe sews some.
When a poodle and a duck sew, now paddles come.
A band breaks slow, when the tweetle socks come.
Won’t you have a minute now, to make Ben some?
I say very slow, look sir, that’s my sock.
Will you sew it quick, and get my box?
Will you be quick when the clocks tick tock?
My poodle can’t battle with a quick-trick fox.
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POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

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PROMPT:

DialedIn

To earn the “Dialed In” badge, start by choosing a phone number — your own, one from a business, or one you make up. Write out the full number (including any area codes) as a series of digits without dashes or parentheses. Decide what your numbers will correspond to in your text – a word choice, sentence choice or page choice to your source text. For instance, if your first number is two (2), you could choose to grab the second word on a page, the second sentence on a page, or the second page in the book. Do this for each digit in the phone number. You can cycle through the phone number series multiple times if necessary to generate enough text for your poem. Post your completed poem to the site, and add a citation for your source text. Do not post the phone number you used, out of privacy considerations.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss

http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/dreeves/Fox-In-Socks.txt

Word List:

a an and band battle be beetle beetles Ben bends Bim’s blubber bottle box breaks bricks brings broom call can can’t cheese choose clocks come comes do duck duddled easy for fox get goes goo grows have here’s hose I in is isn’t Joe Knox lakes like look lots luck’s make minute mixed mouth Mr. my new now on paddles play poodle quick say sew sews sir slick slow sneeze socks some stop Sue Sue’s that’s their these they this three tick to tocks too trick tricks tweetle very what when where whose with won’t you

Nonsense Rain – Instagram poetry

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(click image to enlarge)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I watch storm clouds darken the sky
through my kitchen window pane as
far-off lightning tingles across my skin

my teacup cools on the tablecloth
and my pencil skitters over this page
the paper is old, so old, smells of ocean

of starfish and barefooted souls
dancing with unicorns and hippos
in the branches of ancient trees

my skittish thoughts dance their jig
and I can’t keep trying to wrangle words
that won’t queue on a parched, yellow page

perhaps the hour has come for waltzing
for slipping off shoes in the sea-grass
to dance with the wind in a nonsense rain

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(for Em)

(provided words: lightning, hippos, unicorns, old old paper, ancient trees, barefooted souls, starfish, kitchen tables and tea)

@ConnorPenelope on Instagram