The Road – a Byr a Thoddaid poem

I hear its voice at the window.
Siren songs it sings in the willow.
The road keeps calling — echoes on the wind,
and winds on until dawn.
—–
POETIC FORM:
Byr a Toddaid – a 4-line stanza Welsh form consisting of a single quatrain or a series of quatrains, each divided into 2 combined couplets.  One couplet is 2 lines, eight syllables each with an AA end rhyme. The other couplet is 2 lines, one with 10 syllables and an end rhyme NEAR the end, and the other line with 6 syllables with a link to the end word of the 10 syllable line, then an end rhyme that corresponds to the end rhyme in the same 10 syllable line. The link is near the front of the 6 syllable line, and can be rhyme, alliteration or some other clever device to link the two words.  Couplets can alternate, so there are 2 main options indicated in the outline a below:
Option. 1:
xxxxxxxA
xxxxxxxA
xxxxxxxBxc
xcxxxB
Option 2:
xxxxxxxAxb
xbxxxA
xxxxxxxC
xxxxxxxC
—–
AUDIO FILE:
Advertisements

Come Home

Welcome-home (2)

 
Won’t you come home, baby? Come home!
You’ve worked hard and so far away.
I can feel the weight of the world
on your shoulders, over the phone.

Point that truck our direction.
Won’t you come home, baby? Come home!
We’ll be waiting, we will hold you–
wrap you up in our affection,

take your burdens and let you rest.
We’ve been longing to see your smile.
Won’t you come home, baby? Come home,
to the place where love knows you best!

We know how your heart loves to roam.
How you’re happier on the road,
and we know you know your way back.
When you come home. Baby, come home.

—–

POETIC FORM:

Quatern – 16 lines broken into 4 quatrains. Each line has 8 syllables. 1st line is refrain. In 2nd stanza, refrain appears in 2nd line; 3rd stanza, 3rd line; 4th stanza, 4th (and final) line. No rhyme scheme.

AUDIO FILE:

Unsaid (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

sleepless

 

Sometimes it is the words unsaid,
the darker things that need to keep
–until I sort them, let them steep,
the thoughts that linger in my head.

At times I’m glad they can’t be read
and so I hold them, oh so deep.
Sometimes it is the words unsaid,
the darker things that need to keep.

Some nights I lie awake in bed.
I cannot quiet, cannot sleep.
When others might be counting sheep,
I simply count my thoughts instead.
Sometimes it is the words unsaid.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #20:

For today’s prompt, write a poem of what goes unsaid. Maybe it’s unrequited love, a hidden contempt, spoiler to the most recent TV show or blockbuster movie. Whatever goes unsaid, maybe write it instead.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-20

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Waiting (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

image

There is nothing like the waiting —
not a feeling that can compare.
When I wake and you’re still not there
— my desire is not abating.

No, I’m not here hesitating,
but sometimes it’s hard to find air.
There is nothing like the waiting —
not a feeling that can compare.

I can’t sleep for speculating,
so, I lie awake and I stare,
at your ceiling and empty chair,
–your return anticipating.
There is nothing like the waiting.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:

Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #12:

For today’s prompt, take on one (or both) of the following prompts:

Write a serious poem. Or…Write a silly poem.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-12

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:

The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Fuck Off (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

judging
Tell me, who do you think you are,
and who do you think I should be–
you who have turned judgment on me,
blowing smoke like a bad cigar.

Casting your blame and pitching tar,
you cannot stand that I am free,
telling all how perfect you are,
and just how you think I should be!

You can’t wear my shoes and walk far.
Watch how I laugh, and I simply
enjoy my life — live it carefree.
I am happy, head in the stars.
I don’t care, what you think or are.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #11:

For today’s prompt, write a defensive poem. The first thing that springs to my mind is getting defensive about an accusation, which may or may not be true. The next thing I think about might be people or animals defending themselves. Or defense in sports. Or defense in the court room. Or well, there’s a lot to defend in this world.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-11

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Last Night (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

hugpillow

Last night I slept here, in your bed.
I wrapped myself ’round your pillow,
in the darkness, let the day go,
with its words loud in my head.
Last night I closed my eyes, instead
of listening to their tempo.
Last night I slept here, in your bed.
I wrapped myself ’round your pillow.
I woke to coffee, and sweet bread.
Today, I’ll sit by our willow.
I’ll write my rhymes for this rondeau,
and smile, remembering what you said,
and all our nights shared in your bed.
—–
#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #13:
For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Last (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write the poem. Possible titles include: “Last Word,” “Last Card Catalog,” “Lasting Impression,” “Last Train to Duluth,” and so on.
—–
POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form
—–
AUDIO FILE:

Blues (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

868637be6a57ab4d7b9552b958e00602.jpg

I do not want to write today.
I want to sit. I want to sigh.
I want to watch the world go by,
to watch the rain and here to stay–

at this table, in this café,
and nibble on a slice of pie.
I do not want to write today.
I want to sit. I want to sigh.

I will not mourn, nor will I cry.
It’s not that I am sad that way.
My muse has gone outside to play,
and I am left here, warm and dry.
So, I will write another day.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:

Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #10:

For today’s prompt, pick an emotion, make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles might include: “Happy,” “Sad,” “Angry,” or well, there’s a universe of emotions out there.

.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-10

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Escape to Neverland (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

2016-04-19-13.17.30.png.png

She said lost boys like her are free.
She smiled at me, offered her hand,
invited me to Neverland.
I asked myself how this could be.

She promised me that love’s the key.
This kind of thing happens, unplanned.

She said lost boys like me are free.
She smiled at me and squeezed my hand.

Behind her eyes I found the sea.

We flew and left behind dry land,
straight on till dawn, past two stars, and

I’ll never be the same — not me,
because lost boys like us are free!

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:

Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #9:

For today’s prompt, write a hide out poem. When I was a kid, we’d build “hide outs,” I guess from our parents or other kids. An assortment of criminals (fictionalized and real) have their hide outs. But maybe there are other hide outs, like a “man cave,” “she shed,” or the local pub. Heck, maybe it’s the library. Give it a thought, and I’m sure you’ll find the right hide out poem for you.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-9

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Doodle (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

2016-04-19-12.21.44.jpg.jpg

Let the ink and paper tangle.
Watch the black lines dance on the page
— Fred and Ginger on a blank stage —
twist and turn at every angle.

See that flourish? Watch it dangle,
like a tiger loosed from its cage.
See how ink and paper tangle,
As the black lines leap on the page?

It’s all noise, all bass and jangle–
scattered joy and unbridled rage,
stolen from the battles we wage.
Come and play and don’t act your age.
Watch the ink and paper tangle.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:

Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #8:

For today’s prompt, write a doodle poem. In my mind, I’m thinking of how I like to doodle when I’m talking on the phone or sitting in a meeting. I used to doodle in my classes when I was younger. So for a poem, I’m thinking this could start off as something small that stays small or builds to epic proportions. Doodle around a bit today. If needed, start by describing something close at hand or within your current field of vision.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-8

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Three Wishes – a #NaPoMo #APRPAD Modified Rondeau

threewishes
Three Wishes Dandelion by Helen Holmes Photography

 

Close your eyes. Make a wish. Count to three.
I believe you can fly. You’ve got wings.
There is real magic here, can’t you see–
how it shines, just like stars, how it swings?

Light a match. Hold your breath. Turn the key.
Listen close: There’s a voice and it sings.
Close your eyes. Make a wish. Count to three.
Take a leap. Trust your heart and its wings.

I can show you how, if you’ll trust me.
Nothing up my sleeves, no tricks, no strings.
I craft my spells from favorite things–
like the way your eyes say you love me.
Close them now. Make a wish. Count to three.

—–
#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #3:
For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Three (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Three Blind Hippos,” “Three Muskrats,” “Three’s Company,” “Three Movies Is Too Many for The Hobbit, Peter Jackson (just saying),” and so on.
—–
POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form
NOTE:
For this poem, I’ve modifed the Rondeau to 9 syllables per line, all other conventions remain the same.
—–
AUDIO FILE: