She Swallowed the Moon

girlmooncrescent

The night when she swallowed the moon,
its light gave a glow to her skin.
She felt transformation begin
at midnight the second of June.

She hummed a sweet song, out of tune
and danced like a top set to spin.
The night when she swallowed the moon,
its light gave a glow to her skin.

The stars all about her were strewn
like fireflies drunk on sloe gin.
Though she had no ink for her pen,
silvery words dripped from her spoon,
the night when she swallowed the moon.

———-

POETIC FORM: Rondel
A French form, similar to the rondeau and the triolet, consisting of 13 eight-syllable lines in three stanzas.
Rhyme scheme = ABba/abAB/abbaA

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To Tie the Moon (a chance operation poem)

ropemoon

Women who tied
the moon, wrap it’s heart
strings, lows.
We dance, have
you again.

You rare body, to father,
belongs — but sorrow
on a shawl. Keep you
to you now.
It is a book of poems,
worked from your stay.

You loved man — absinthe,
poison and god.
Sweeten you — to
have your heart
to yourself like a diary.

Like ocean.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

SpacedOut

 

To earn the “Spaced Out” badge, start with two dice and your source text. You’ll want to work with a smaller section of the text for this one. For each line in the text, roll the dice. Erase or remove the word in that line that corresponds with the number that comes up (i.e., if you roll an eight, erase the eighth word in that line). Continue to work through the text, re-rolling the dice for each line, until you’ve reached the end of your source text solution. Repeat this process, rolling the dice and removing additional words from each line, until you arrive at your poem. Experiment with space, illustration or other visual presentation to engage with the relative silence created. Post your poem to the site, accompanied by a source text citation.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

 

When You Feel Stuck (a chance operation poem)

stuck-in-mud

this change waited
feeling responsibility
feeling quicksand
stuck

waited forever felt
the pull possible
nothing
stuck

within the need born
destiny here, while
conditions procrastinate
stuck

what fixed future —
we feeling spiritual
feeling truly
stuck

wept change
when someone
felt nothing
you stuck

that feeling — change
with response
overwhelming responsibility
it stuck

whatever the changing
reality
(circumstances forever
feeling pull)
encounters you

when they change
with nearly nothing
surprisingly —
yourself

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

 

 

SpellingBee

 

To earn the “Spelling B” badge, you’ll need your source text and a “seed” phrase, Your seed phrase is a sentence or fragment that contains at least 20 characters and which can be related or not to your source. For instance, if your source text is a book on baseball, you might choose “Take me out to the ballgame” as your seed phrase. If your source text is on the Beatles, you might choose, “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Visit the Diastic Poem Generator at http://www.languageisavirus.com/diastic-poem-generator.html. Enter your seed phrase and source text in the corresponding boxes, then click “Generate.” The program will create a “spell-through” of your text. Using the “take me out to the ballgame” example, the program will search through your text for the first word that has T in the first position (it might be a word like “the,” “travel,” or “true”) and add it to your word list. Next, it searches for a word that has “a” in the second position (e.g. “cap,” “batboy,” “game”), and so on, until it reaches the end of your seed text. Add the results to your word bank, and keep clicking “Generate” to add additional iterations. For a more experimental text, keep the resulting text intact. Otherwise, remove text to create your poem — but try to keep the words in order. Post your poem to the site, along with citations for your source text and seed phrase.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: 10 Powerful Quotes to Read When We’re Feeling Stuck by Becky Volimer on Elephant Journal
SEED PHRASE: “When We’re Feeling Stuck”

A Duck in Socks (a chance operation poem)

socks

———-
Tricks come easy for a duck in socks —
to battle these beetles and make tick tocks.
A bottle for cheese can break these clocks.
Won’t you be quick sir, and choose a box?
My mouth bends and I blubber for a minute.
A sock can be easy, when to sew these isn’t.
I come in quick with new socks to get
you to sew for me in a sock battle. Get it?
These bricks make breaks in three-trick goo
and a broom and a box can’t stop what you do.
Look sir, here’s a hose, and a sock on Sue.
Will you call Mr. Knox to sew for you?
My socks are easy for some to be in.
Joe isn’t slow — this luck’s for Ben.
Socks can get mixed, and stop tricks, when
you get a poodle and a fox duddled in.
Sue’s socks are slick and Joe sews some.
When a poodle and a duck sew, now paddles come.
A band breaks slow, when the tweetle socks come.
Won’t you have a minute now, to make Ben some?
I say very slow, look sir, that’s my sock.
Will you sew it quick, and get my box?
Will you be quick when the clocks tick tock?
My poodle can’t battle with a quick-trick fox.
—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

DialedIn

To earn the “Dialed In” badge, start by choosing a phone number — your own, one from a business, or one you make up. Write out the full number (including any area codes) as a series of digits without dashes or parentheses. Decide what your numbers will correspond to in your text – a word choice, sentence choice or page choice to your source text. For instance, if your first number is two (2), you could choose to grab the second word on a page, the second sentence on a page, or the second page in the book. Do this for each digit in the phone number. You can cycle through the phone number series multiple times if necessary to generate enough text for your poem. Post your completed poem to the site, and add a citation for your source text. Do not post the phone number you used, out of privacy considerations.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss

http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/dreeves/Fox-In-Socks.txt

Word List:

a an and band battle be beetle beetles Ben bends Bim’s blubber bottle box breaks bricks brings broom call can can’t cheese choose clocks come comes do duck duddled easy for fox get goes goo grows have here’s hose I in is isn’t Joe Knox lakes like look lots luck’s make minute mixed mouth Mr. my new now on paddles play poodle quick say sew sews sir slick slow sneeze socks some stop Sue Sue’s that’s their these they this three tick to tocks too trick tricks tweetle very what when where whose with won’t you

Brillig Nonsense (a chance operation poem)

jabberwocky1

jabberwocky1 (2)

Jabberwocky2

 

Chortled borogroves,
Jabberwock galumphing
Jabberwock manxome

arms snicker through the outgrabe
whiffling, “Beware! ” Did wabe were blade
borogroves, long frabjous, went raths.

That bandersnatch back
—————–Callooh Tumtum
His sought stood brillig
————— Jabberwock

Mimsy outgrabe mome, dead Jubjub
and slain frumious two — that head with sword.
Toves burbled, did.

‘Twas all came and went
were through claws
and he gimble
——-— mimsy, slithy —
and the snack gimble.
‘Twas come uffish toves
———–catch rested time.

Callay and vorpal, through brillig thought,
stood tulgey, and took, and slithy mome.
Hand thou flame, and jaws the thought!

He beamish wood, with the vorpal and eyes,
gyre and wabe awhile all raths
Boy, beware to shun the gyre!

So by the came of he the one
My, my — bite one
———–— the joy!

And the to bird tree left his day.
In foe, the in, the hast, the O
————————My son.

 

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

ShakeItUp

 

To earn the “Shake It Up” badge, follow the mandate ofTristanTzara in “How to MakeaDadaist Poem” (http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/tzara.html) to create a cut-up poem. Start by  cutting out desired words or phrases from a source text, and put them in a paper bag or other container. Shake the container to mix up the words, then pull them out one by one. Place them on the table in the order you draw them to create your poem — no removing or reordering words permitted. Post your poem — or a picture of your cut-up if possible — on the site, along with a source text citation.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

Daughter (a chance operation poem)

motherdaughter

My compassionate daughter:
while tonight we feel this pain,
we touch today in affection.
We feel wanted, in pragmatism.

My empath daughter:
In partnerships, remove even this.
Be this affection, However we feel.
Today, we wanted them, too.
Tonight, even we feel lives.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

—–

PROMPT:

RollTheDice

To earn the “Roll the Dice” badge, start with multiple dice and your source text. You can use regular six-sided dice, or ones with more sides (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dice#Non-cubic). Assign each line on your source text page a number — you can work consecutively (first line = 1, second line = 2), in reverse order (last line = 1, etc) or in any order you choose. Roll the dice — whatever line corresponds to the number that came up gets added to your word bank. Continue rolling the dice until you have a big enough word bank to craft a poem. For an extra challenge, retain the full original lines in your finished piece. Post your completed poem to the site, accompanied by your source text citation.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

How to Love and Empath by Rebecca Lammersen on Elephant Journal

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/01/how-to-love-an-empath/

WORD LIST:

my, even, I, to, or, today, this, pain, daughter, compassionate, we, however, remove, touch, them, while, and, feel, pragmatism, too, tonight, in, wanted, empath, partnerships, feels, I, be, affection, if, lives

You’re the Only North (a conceptual poem)

couplefight

Call back time, Let felicity fly.
Blanket the bed, and kiss goodbye.

I was terribly lost, crossed and dark.
You’re the only north I would follow.

Fight back, bring on the break,
and blow to bits.

Dear, I was terribly crossed and dark.
But you’re the north I follow this far.

Keep an eye on hope,
Lest I blink and get nothing to say.

‘Cause you’re the blinding light
the saving grace of the saving grace.

God, I was lost and dark, dear.
You’re only this far… I would follow.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

BestLaidPlan

To earn the “Best Laid Plan” badge, approach a text with a plan to remove something. Think beyond just a single word and instead consider removing references to a subject or emotion, actions taken by certain characters, colors, etc. Whatever you choose, apply your approach and, keeping as much of the remaining text intact as possible, create your poem from results. Post your poem to the site, include a citation for your source text, as well as a note on your approach.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: “Galaxies” by Owl City
(www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/owlcity/galaxies.html)

The Tango of Being (a conceptual poem)

tangoguitar

This is the opening human,
and creative philosophy–
Music moves us like no other.

This is being.

This sustains a creative tension–
the spiritual background of childhood–
raised in bucolic place,
dirt roads insects gardens.
Wonderful trees passed away
when I was young.

By the time I was eleven
I went into a spiritual crisis:
From early life you grew up listening.
My father would stop shaving
to finish a phrase of the tango.
I was an advocate of identity
felt it important to show who I am.

Tango was going to come
into my life, I just had to wait.
Tango taps into such passion:
you have to have lived.

I decided to explore.
This is being.

Tango will say a little more
about that root
of your identity, I think–
articulate things–
use of silence and space.
You heard the silence.
It’s all those spaces you know.

I love that moment when
you’re suspended–
silence
–between the space
of two notes.
something that comes
from within.

You don’t really know who
is doing it, but it is
connection beyond
understanding.

It’s really hard to talk
about the moment I am,
creating and confronted with
whatever comes out of my hands.
It’s something
that connects with my heart.
To make that leap, we don’t
always have access.

Being, being
continues in a moment.
This is being.

Music becomes
a part of the fabric,
something that connects
with the heartbeat, has power
to steer your emotions–
has power to transform you.

Music does this.
This is being.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

QuietOnSet

 

To earn the “Quiet on Set” badge, choose a television program, podcast, or movie of at least 30 minutes in length. Press play and start transcribing what you hear — no pressing pause, turning on subtitles or referencing a script allowed! You won’t be able to keep up, and that’s the point. When completed, create a poem out of your transcribed words. You can delete — but not reorder — your transcribed text. Post your poem to the site, and include a citation for your source media.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

On Being Podcast with Krista Tippett – Gustavo Santaolalla – How Movie Music Moves Us

Time Out (a conceptual poem)

cornertime (2)

 

if our lives have been a whirlwind
if we had the best of intentions
if our heads and hearts did finally match up
if we were finally in a place
(where we didn’t need to convince ourselves)
if we were able to just let go
if our decisions make sense or not
if we all simply received a time out

now
now it’s crucial for us to sit
now take a deep breath
now about time-lines or about keeping pace
now we are making the right choice
now exactly what we want and need
now is the time when it all comes together

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

XY

 

To earn the “X:Y” badge, choose a syntactical relationship between words within a given text — look for patterns in how words are joined by punctuation or conjunctions, or how sentences are structured. Examples of syntactical relationships: “wine and cheese,” “man and wife,” “fear and loathing”, “this or that,” “him or me,” “wine or beer”, “The stove was hot.” “The room was silent.” “The table was dusty.”
“the wind blowing,” “the birds chirping,” “the mower whirring”, Choose a syntactical pattern, and go through your source text, making a list of all phrases and fragments that fit the pattern. Create a poem from your list. Example: Seth Abramson’s “Wii” (BOAAT): http://www.boaatpress.com/seth-abramson#wii Post your poem on the site, along with a citation of your source text.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2015/06/mercury-retrograde-is-over-now-what/

Confessions Without Faces (a conceptual poem)

wpid-rosary-in-hand-bw.jpg

 

I feel conflicted about the
name of my adult life so far.
No one but me knows… I can’t
bring myself to get out of my head.

Would you like to discuss grief?
It’s like trying to eat a sour rock
to alleviate inner pain. Almost
every day, around people, I hide.

Always, I am wearing my secret —
poetry dripping from my tongue,
making people want to kiss me.
like a peach from the fridge.

All the time knowing — time
must come first — at the moment,
you are able to see my body,
to drink of its passion.

I struggle with this wish — to feel
and not feel — old but comfortable,
a yellow t-shirt in a paper bag,
in a mental hospital, reading, reading.

There was all that time, it was most
important to be shown that you matter.
And I think about doing it again —
instead of being what you want.

Gray shades of writing, and wearing
a blue sweatshirt, you are gorgeous.
I tell you, I think about it every night,
the first time I tasted you.

Not forbidden for me, but not good
for me –I’m not sorry, I’m grateful
for the way you stay with me,
forever in the best odds and ends.

—–

POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

SurveySays

To earn the “Survey Says!” badge, create a questionnaire about a given topic that contains between 5-10 free response questions. Ask your family members, friends, or even complete strangers to complete the survey. Use their responses to compose a poem, and post it on the site. In your citation, list the questions you asked in your questionnaire.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

Word List:
2 50 a able about absolutely accidentally actually Adidas adult again all alleviate almost also always am an and another Arby’s are around art as ask assortment at ate baby back bacon bag band batch be beans being belly berry best better birthday black blouse blue body books boring both bought bread bring Bronte brothers brown brussel-sprouts burger but by can’t care cargo carrots cat cats cheese chips cider clothes color come comfortable companies company conflicted consists contains cookie cookies coping could crafting crush cuddle currently curtains cut cut-off cutter cutting damn dark date dates day definitely discuss dish disliked do doing don’t Dr Pepper drink dripping easily eat eggplant eggs ends equally etc. ever every express falling fan far favorite feel felt fiancé filter first flip-flops food for forbidden forever fresh fridge friend friendship from frozen fruit fruits get gluten-free go good goopy gorgeous got grabbed grateful gravy gray grey grief gross had hair haircut happily hard hardest have he head hearts hehe help helping her hide highly him hospital house household how hugs hummus husband I I’m Ian if important in inner insecure instead instead into into is it it’s its jamma jean jeans just keeps Kei’s kid kiss know knowing knows last life like list loaf love lunch mac majority makes making married maternity matter may maybe me me meats Memmi men’s mental Mercedes Mexico middle milk mini mix moment more most motorcycle much muffin must my myself n name navy Nazi Nazis need new New Mexico newer night night-gown no not nothing now oatmeal odds of ok old on one only or or originally other our out overly-sweet overnight pad pain paint paints pair pans panties pants paper parm Parmesan partners parts passion peach people Pepper perhaps person picking pictures pilot pink pinstripe plus poetry politely polka-dot postcard price Prilosec primal punisher put question ranch reading really regular rest restaurant right ripen rock rollers roommate running sandwich say scotch Seamus secret see set severely sex shades shirt shopping shorts should shown since sisters slacks sleeve slew so soap social socks someone something somewhat sorry sour space Spam spanking specific spent started stay still store stress struggle style stylized sweat sweatshirt sweetener sweeter swimsuit t t-shirt t-shirt tank Taos taste tasted Te teenager tell Tess texture Thai that the them then there they thing things think this three-quarter time to together tongue too top tortillas trying turquoise undercooked unexpectedly up used usual vegetables veggies vintage vodka Von vw waffles want was water way we wearing weird well were wet what what’s whether whiskey white whole why will wish with work worker worth would writing yellow yogurt you your
Questions:
1. What was the last thing you ate and disliked?
2. What is the one question you wish someone would ask you right now?
3.  What are you wearing?
4. Tell me a secret?
5. What’s on your shopping list?