Confessions Without Faces (a conceptual poem)

wpid-rosary-in-hand-bw.jpg

 

I feel conflicted about the
name of my adult life so far.
No one but me knows… I can’t
bring myself to get out of my head.

Would you like to discuss grief?
It’s like trying to eat a sour rock
to alleviate inner pain. Almost
every day, around people, I hide.

Always, I am wearing my secret —
poetry dripping from my tongue,
making people want to kiss me.
like a peach from the fridge.

All the time knowing — time
must come first — at the moment,
you are able to see my body,
to drink of its passion.

I struggle with this wish — to feel
and not feel — old but comfortable,
a yellow t-shirt in a paper bag,
in a mental hospital, reading, reading.

There was all that time, it was most
important to be shown that you matter.
And I think about doing it again —
instead of being what you want.

Gray shades of writing, and wearing
a blue sweatshirt, you are gorgeous.
I tell you, I think about it every night,
the first time I tasted you.

Not forbidden for me, but not good
for me –I’m not sorry, I’m grateful
for the way you stay with me,
forever in the best odds and ends.

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POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

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PROMPT:

SurveySays

To earn the “Survey Says!” badge, create a questionnaire about a given topic that contains between 5-10 free response questions. Ask your family members, friends, or even complete strangers to complete the survey. Use their responses to compose a poem, and post it on the site. In your citation, list the questions you asked in your questionnaire.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

Word List:
2 50 a able about absolutely accidentally actually Adidas adult again all alleviate almost also always am an and another Arby’s are around art as ask assortment at ate baby back bacon bag band batch be beans being belly berry best better birthday black blouse blue body books boring both bought bread bring Bronte brothers brown brussel-sprouts burger but by can’t care cargo carrots cat cats cheese chips cider clothes color come comfortable companies company conflicted consists contains cookie cookies coping could crafting crush cuddle currently curtains cut cut-off cutter cutting damn dark date dates day definitely discuss dish disliked do doing don’t Dr Pepper drink dripping easily eat eggplant eggs ends equally etc. ever every express falling fan far favorite feel felt fiancé filter first flip-flops food for forbidden forever fresh fridge friend friendship from frozen fruit fruits get gluten-free go good goopy gorgeous got grabbed grateful gravy gray grey grief gross had hair haircut happily hard hardest have he head hearts hehe help helping her hide highly him hospital house household how hugs hummus husband I I’m Ian if important in inner insecure instead instead into into is it it’s its jamma jean jeans just keeps Kei’s kid kiss know knowing knows last life like list loaf love lunch mac majority makes making married maternity matter may maybe me me meats Memmi men’s mental Mercedes Mexico middle milk mini mix moment more most motorcycle much muffin must my myself n name navy Nazi Nazis need new New Mexico newer night night-gown no not nothing now oatmeal odds of ok old on one only or or originally other our out overly-sweet overnight pad pain paint paints pair pans panties pants paper parm Parmesan partners parts passion peach people Pepper perhaps person picking pictures pilot pink pinstripe plus poetry politely polka-dot postcard price Prilosec primal punisher put question ranch reading really regular rest restaurant right ripen rock rollers roommate running sandwich say scotch Seamus secret see set severely sex shades shirt shopping shorts should shown since sisters slacks sleeve slew so soap social socks someone something somewhat sorry sour space Spam spanking specific spent started stay still store stress struggle style stylized sweat sweatshirt sweetener sweeter swimsuit t t-shirt t-shirt tank Taos taste tasted Te teenager tell Tess texture Thai that the them then there they thing things think this three-quarter time to together tongue too top tortillas trying turquoise undercooked unexpectedly up used usual vegetables veggies vintage vodka Von vw waffles want was water way we wearing weird well were wet what what’s whether whiskey white whole why will wish with work worker worth would writing yellow yogurt you your
Questions:
1. What was the last thing you ate and disliked?
2. What is the one question you wish someone would ask you right now?
3.  What are you wearing?
4. Tell me a secret?
5. What’s on your shopping list?

 

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An Invitation to Dance (an out-and-about poem)

dance 2

 

Will you call me, asking yourself —
if you give way, how will you
cross the days to get to
the clean years, yourself?
Are you wise, and will you work
to earn the joy you get?
Will you move mostly of free will?
Music will find you moving,
an art in this world.
a boy with an honest face for heat,
and an eye for beautiful need,
Will you join in the dance?
Will you show yourself
in the painting you make?
Will you live, in rivers,
rent room in a ramble house?
A silent something need not
welcome the whole collection.
Waltz in time with the water
and free yourself, will you?

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POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:

AsAdvertised

 

To earn the “As Advertised” badge, locate a community bulletin board — try places like a library, coffee shop or university campus. Create a poem using only words found on the posters and fliers. Take a picture of the bulletin board to post alongside your poem.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE:

words:
a acceleration affordable all allowed American an and annual any apartment approximately art arts as asking at auction available bags beautiful been beginners bi-weekly box boxes boy brush builders by call camp candy canning car cargo carpentry celebration cell children chords clean cleaning cleanings clean-up clerks collection college community competed complete completed condition contact converts cross dance day days design digital display distribute doors drive drop-in drywall earn engineering enter estate excellent expanses expertise eye face fall families farm featuring feed fencing finishes flower foods for framing free Friday front fully fund-raiser funds gas gelding get give giveaways glide good great group harvest has hauling heat help hike home honest hour house how hull hunters imaging in included info interior it it’s items Japanese jobs join joy junk kayak large lasting library live long lots making manual manufacturing martial me meeting mileage mills model Monday moose more mostly move moving much music name nearly need never new not now nursery of office on one-time only organics organize our over owner paddle painter painting part perfect person pet’s plastic popular power price print prize professional prompt public quality queen raffle ramble rates reason references refreshments reliable rent repair rest rivers room sage sale Saturday school season serving session show silent size sleep small sofa something space spirits spring stroke studio Sunday sunny support swift sword technique the their this thoroughbred through tiling time tire to town traditional trailer transmission treat truck turf two upper use valley very viewing waltz washing water way we Wednesday week weekly welcome west wheel whole will window windows wise with work workshop world years you yourself zone
board (2)

A Thousand Times

(after Sting)

galaxiesinhand

I close my eyes, and see you in my head —
eyes and lips, fingers, shoulders, hips.
My mind spins and stutters, beyond my control
with these insistent questions and their answers.

Today, the knowing and the journey that is you
are the breaths between the ticking of my clock
— “a thousand times the mysteries
unfold themselves like galaxies in my head.”

Gazing inward, I wonder — unsettled and unsure.
Which words are meant for telling you
the things I long to say? Which of these
vast silences are filled with unexplored truth?

I gaze outward — watching, memorizing you:
your tells, sudden shifts, fluid movements.
I find more mystery, than understanding,
more turbulent galaxies, folding and unfolding.

You are like a great window flung open on
the universe, I stand staring out, peering in.
Just as I discover something to grasp —
spinning in your dazzling light — you close.

I slide downward, sit beside your wall
wondering — what have I seen? What part
of you can I take from this close encounter?
Silent and over-thinking — with galaxies in my hands.

 

POEM INFORMATION:

Poem inspired by A Thousand Years, written and performed by Gordon Sumner (Sting), on the album Brand New Day, released by A&M Records on 24 September 1999. (lyrics linked above)

ADDITIONAL CITATION INFORMATION:

Hunted

girlindarkwoods

Your growl tells me
you’re predator
and my tripping pulse
must be the siren
song of prey.

Alone in these dark
woods, in spite of
the moonlight, I can’t
tell from the shadows.

You breathe as if
to taste the air.
I hear your tongue
rasp against your teeth.

Though my trembling
hands twist in my skirts,
my thoughts chase
each other headlong
down the path
of wild fantasy.

Wandering, wondering:
is your hunger carnal
or sanguine; Are you
warm-blooded or cold–
werewolf or vampire–
hunting me?

The Storm (a remixing poem)

we in the rain

He touched her –rain perfume
–her flesh white, enveloping,
a soothing rhythm about her,
hair disheveled, drowsy.

Touching his passion she stood;
he remembered nothing–
an entrance made arms,
mouth– steaming her throat.

His heart she clasped.
His hand stroked, playing–
firm bosom, like time in rain,
her hair back, sensuous.

And she — stiflingly defenselessness
the mystery he had lost,
broken by quiet that threatened,
eyes — still white lightning.

Passionate creature, open
her desire flame red —
would retreating seem a passing
cloud or a cyclone, breathless?

Dazed he dared look away
nervously flung himself before her
obscuring the view, did not heed
eyes so inviting, without guile.

Crashing torrents, mysterious, at
the borderland of ecstasy, inviting.
If she hands hope, in quivering lips–
now he looked — liquid blue eyes.

Releasing him and herself to
her birthright, he kissed–
The thunder was his, and she–
his! A storm, encircled.

Infatuation and desire aroused!
The distant rain filled all,
kissed her, He tasted
laugh of delight, upon her lips:
revelation– knowing her!

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem

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PROMPT:
Blender

To earn the Blender badge, choose either a source text that already exists in digital form, or a printed text that you’re willing to type out. Next, navigate to The Text-Mixing Desk at The Lazarus Corporation (http://www.lazaruscorporation.co.uk/cutup/text-mixing-desk), paste your text, adjust the controls and click “Start the Mix!”
Copy down the result exactly as it comes out of the Text Mixing Desk. Repeat the mixing process with additional sections of text if you want a longer language bank to work with.
Craft your poem from the results using words IN THE ORDER they appear in the original. You may delete words but not reorder them.
Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE TEXT: The Storm – a short story by Kate Chopin

Storm-Tossed (a 108 word poem)

womanboat

The moon has been pushing,
tugging my tides, of late.
My ship is tossed by a wild,
mercurial sea.

I relish these days, the fervor
and elation, but my soul longs
for the harbor that is you.

I’ve been watching brooding skies
checking charts and maps
–hoping to find my way
back to where you are.

Do you perhaps stand
at the shoreline, shining
a beacon to light
the way?

When I appear over the
the stormy horizon–
cast me a line?
Tow me to shore?

Gather me into your arms
— into your body?
Will you give me shelter,
and show me what
loving you can be?

—–

PROMPT:

108 Word Poem – Poetry challenge, inspired by The Quiet World, by Jeffrey McDaniel http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179259 – If you could only write 108 words to your lover… (167 less 59) write a poem with exactly 108 words.

I Do Not Know (a remixing poem – cento)

manwomanmeet

As a kid, I would count backwards
from ten and imagine at one,
patience and love agreed
to meet at a set time and place,
beneath the questions you
had never asked.

His voice in this room,
her eyes a closed book—
“I barely know you,” she says,
voice heavy with sleep.
“I don’t know,
no one truly knows,
who they are,” he sighs.

The glass bottle does
anything and everything,
always seeking.
Dawn turns to day —
it happens like this:

One day you meet someone,
and for some the answer is
“Yes, always yes! I cannot
deny you anything!

You — do you remember
our first day? The fog lifted
and all around us,
I  saw a dream.
We said hello at half past one.

It was one of those nights
that you are not altogether
sure, really. I did not know —
perhaps I never loved enough.
As the earth began spinning
faster and faster, we floated.

“Be careful about giving your
heart too quickly,” I was told.
“Love a girl who writes.”

There is a tide that rolls away,
like time suspended —
the path from you extending.
For all the time I’ve known you,
in a sea of strangers,
you were the one —

A midnight scribble
stretching out from here to then,
You were faultless.
Do you see?
You may not know.
You are the moment before
the sun sinks into the horizon.

The timing is irrelevant when
two people are meant for each other.
It’s your love I once surrendered.
Do you remember
what you once said to me?

“When two souls fall in love,
there is nothing else
but the yearning—
sorrow tells stories.”
I wonder if there will be a morning
when you’ll wake up missing.

Do you know that feeling—
when it’s like you’ve lost something?
“I don’t know what to say,” he said.
“There are people I will never know—
I am somebody else’s story.”

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem

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PROMPT:
FirstInLine
To earn the First in Line badge, choose a published collection of poems by a single poet. Copy down the first line of each poem in the collection. Craft a poem using select lines from your list — you must keep the wording of the original lines intact, but may make alterations to elements like line breaks, punctuation and capitalization. The challenge with this form (often called a cento) is to use another poet’s lines to create a piece that sounds like it’s from YOUR voice.
For an example of a poem created using the first lines of other texts, check out Alex MacDonald’s “Free Verse Cento”:http://campus.poetryschool.com/free-verse-cento/
Credit your source collection and specific poems excerpted at the bottom of your post.
—–
PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
—–
SOURCE TEXT: Lullabies by Lang Leav

What Do You See? (a remixing poem)

gypsy
Do you see a future
as a medium?
I don’t know, do you?
What does that mean to you?

You don’t know what
tomorrow’s going to be like?
Is that what you mean?
If nobody heard it, did it happen?

It’s the effect?
So that was it?
Getting on the plane?
Can you imagine the ride west?

Do you remember?
What were your thoughts
when you saw him?
And what is it he said?

“What the fuck?”
Well, why not?
What am I complaining about?
I walked into that one, didn’t I?

Is that in your mind?
How will history remember?
And why should they?
What would you do?

Do you think we were surprised,
to find that the American Dream
was a nightclub, that had burned
down five years earlier?

A happy ending?
Was it there for people to find?

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem
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PROMPT:
 Interrogator
To earn the Interrogator badge, begin by selecting a source text of your choice. Copy down all of the questions it contains. Create a poem that’s a series of questions from the list you excerpted. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
  • April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
  • Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
  • Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
  • Poets choose their own source text.
  • For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
—–
SOURCE TEXT: 
Writing on the Wall – an Interview with Hunter S. Thompson – The Atlantic Online (http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/unbound/graffiti/hunter.htm)

The Declaration (a remixing poem)

mirror

There comes a time
we must stand
before the mirror
look into our tired eyes

creative, independent
our true selves
destined for greatness
human kindness

each of us consent
our desires unlimited
freedom enslaving us
to popular boredom

when will we be ready
to ask such questions
we race into mazes
do we live as mice?

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem
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PROMPT:
PickNMix
To earn the Pick & Mix badge, begin by selecting a source text of your choice.  Browse through a selection of your text, copying down words and phrases that interest you. Craft a poem using only words you found in the text, arranging them in any order you choose. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project
  • April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
  • Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
  • Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
  • Poets choose their own source text.
  • For more information, check out pomosco.com.
A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.
—–
SOURCE TEXT:  The Motivation Manifesto – Brendon Burchard

Chemistry (a triolet)

stormeye

What is the matter in a spring rain–
hydrogen, oxygen, energy?
Would you understand, if I tried to explain?
What is the matter in a spring rain–
that makes me want you, drives me insane?
I ache to ignite that chemistry.
Need is what matters! Bring on your rain–
your hydrogen, oxygen and energy.

—–

POETIC FORM: Triolet
An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.
FORM DIAGRAM:
A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

Here’s the final “Two for Tuesday” prompt of the month:

1. Write a matter poem. Matter is what things are made of.
2. Write an anti-matter poem. The opposite of a matter poem.