Three Wishes – a #NaPoMo #APRPAD Modified Rondeau

threewishes
Three Wishes Dandelion by Helen Holmes Photography

 

Close your eyes. Make a wish. Count to three.
I believe you can fly. You’ve got wings.
There is real magic here, can’t you see–
how it shines, just like stars, how it swings?

Light a match. Hold your breath. Turn the key.
Listen close: There’s a voice and it sings.
Close your eyes. Make a wish. Count to three.
Take a leap. Trust your heart and its wings.

I can show you how, if you’ll trust me.
Nothing up my sleeves, no tricks, no strings.
I craft my spells from favorite things–
like the way your eyes say you love me.
Close them now. Make a wish. Count to three.

—–
#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #3:
For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Three (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Three Blind Hippos,” “Three Muskrats,” “Three’s Company,” “Three Movies Is Too Many for The Hobbit, Peter Jackson (just saying),” and so on.
—–
POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form
NOTE:
For this poem, I’ve modifed the Rondeau to 9 syllables per line, all other conventions remain the same.
—–
AUDIO FILE:

How Poetry Goes (What She Said) – a #NaPoMo #APRPAD Rondeau

block2
Some days it’s how poetry goes.
“Hey, don’t sweat it!” That’s what she said.
Write six lines, then eat jam with bread.
Second guess the rhyme scheme you chose.

Count your syllables, like they’re crows —
put on your sweater. Make your bed.
Some days it’s how poetry goes.
“Go for a walk.” That’s what she said.

“Embrace your whims, and juxtapose.”
Swap out ink for pencil, instead.
Sip your coffee, then scratch your head.
It’s a dance, every poet knows —
Most days, it’s how poetry goes.

—–

#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #2:

For today’s prompt, write a what he said and/or what she said poem. Maybe he or she said a rumor; maybe he or she gave directions; or maybe he or she said something that made absolutely no sense at all. I don’t know what they said; rather, each poet is tasked with revealing that knowledge. http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-2

—–

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

—–

AUDIO FILE:

Foolish – a Rondeau

(with a bit of nonce* in the style of Lewis Carroll)

 

poetryinjar

 

You may find me mad and foolish —
my head in a sky full of stars,
hiding poems in socks and jars.
Do you think that’s gimb and trulish?

Of course I learned from monks prulish,
to tell tall-tales and steal memoirs.
That may well sound cruel and foolish,
make your head spin, your eyes see stars —

Are you feeling ill and mookish?
Yes, I stack books in damp bazaars,
and my methods won’t sell cigars —
so your judgment may be roufish.
Still, I like me odd and foolish!


*nonce (näns/) – adjective
  1. (of a word or expression) coined for or used on one occasion.

    “a nonce usage”


 

—–

 

#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #1:

For today’s prompt, write a foolish poem. It’s April Fool’s Day, after all. Let’s loosen up today with a poem in which we’re fools, others are fools, or there’s some kind of prank or tomfoolery happening. Fool around with it a while. http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-1

 

—–

 

POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

 

—–

 

AUDIO FILE: