Chemistry (a triolet)

stormeye

What is the matter in a spring rain–
hydrogen, oxygen, energy?
Would you understand, if I tried to explain?
What is the matter in a spring rain–
that makes me want you, drives me insane?
I ache to ignite that chemistry.
Need is what matters! Bring on your rain–
your hydrogen, oxygen and energy.

—–

POETIC FORM: Triolet
An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.
FORM DIAGRAM:
A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

Here’s the final “Two for Tuesday” prompt of the month:

1. Write a matter poem. Matter is what things are made of.
2. Write an anti-matter poem. The opposite of a matter poem.

Storm Watch (a terzanelle)

gate (2)

My rusty gate hangs on its hinge.
and swings in the warm evening breeze,
while I watch it turn with a twinge.

Under the arms of my pear trees
a stillness lies heavy and dark.
Dread hovers on the evening breeze.

Electric, the air tastes of sparks
like firework nights in July.
The stillness lies heavy and dark.

I hold my breath, watch as the sky
clouds over — a sickly, pea-green.
Like firework nights in July,

A thunderclap bangs — like a screen.
The weatherman warns it will storm,
these clouds are a sickly, pea-green.

I shiver as thunderheads form.
The rusty gate groans on its hinge.
Warns me, soon this weather will storm,
while I watch it turn with a twinge.

—–

POETIC FORM:

Terzanelle combines the lyricism of the terza rima with the repetition of the villanelle to make a powerful one-two punch in only 19 lines. The traditional stance on the terzanelle is that the lines should be written in a consistent iambic meter, but there are plenty of contemporary terzanelles that just aspire to keep the lines a consistent length throughout.

—–

FORM DIAGRAM:

A1-
B-
A2-

b-
C-
B-
c-
D-
C-
d-
E-
D-
e-
F-
E-
f-
A1-
F-
A2-

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a swing poem. Sure, there are park swings and mood swings; there’s swing music and swing dancing; and there are swingers. Some people swing one way; others swing another. In politics, there are swing votes and swing states. And many people have swung a bat, an ax, and/or a hammer in their lifetimes.”

Squall (a quatern)

squall

She’s the squall that loves the dry-line,
begs him chase her from east to west.
With her stormy hips she teases,
draws his gaze, she’s working her spell.

He’s got swagger, keeps his cool–and
she’s the squall that loves the dry-line.
Blowing kisses, tossing her cape,
she invites him to come and dance.

Shaking moisture from her skirts, she
catches his eyes, flashing lightning.
She’s the squall that loves the dry-line–
wild, unstable–still he’s tempted.

This electric charge they share is
passion, stormy and explosive.
If you hear their cries, you’ll know her–
she’s the squall that loves the dry-line.

—–

POETIC FORM: QUATERN

16 lines broken up into 4 quatrains (or 4-line stanzas). Each line is comprised of 8 syllables. 1st line is the refrain (R). In the 2nd stanza, the refrain appears in the 2nd line; in the 3rd stanza, the 3rd line; in the 4th stanza, the 4th (and final) line. There are no rules for rhyming or iambics.

—–

FORM DIAGRAM:

1(R)
2
3
4

1
2(R)
3
4

1
2
3(R)
4

1
2
3
4(R)

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a work poem. For some folks, writing is work (great, huh?). For others, work is teaching, engineering, or delivering pizzas. Still others, dream of having work to help them pay the bills or go to all ages shows. Some don’t want work, don’t need work, and are glad to be free of the rat race. There are people who work out, work on problems, and well, I’ll let you work out how to handle your poem today.”

Temptation (a palindrome)

wpid-2015-04-08-11.12.05.jpg.jpeg

Dare you!
Do you
— face to clouds —
brave storms
like I do?
Chase the thrill,
the adrenaline rush!
This lust’s my lure.
Will you surrender to
temptation?
To surrender, you will
lure my lusts?
This rush!
Adrenaline!
The thrill, the chase–
Do I like storms?
Brave clouds to face you?
Do YOU dare?

—–

POETIC FORM: PALINDROME

Use the same words in 1st half of the poem as the 2nd half, but reverse the order for 2nd half, and use a word in the middle as a bridge between 2 halves.

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a dare poem. This poem could be written as a dare to someone. It could make a daring proclamation. It could involve a dare that someone has accepted…or refused. In a way, each day of this challenge is a dare to write a poem. Are you ready for the challenge?”

Balsam Lane (a triolet)

norain

The forecast was for rain,
(though we’re still in the dry)
downtown at fifth and main.
The forecast was for rain.
I’m here at Balsam Lane—
no clouds are in the sky.
The forecast was for rain,
though we’re still in the dry.

—–

POETIC FORM: Triolet

An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a things-not-as-they-appear poem. Poetry is filled with metaphors, similes, symbols, and layered meanings, so this should be a softball prompt. If you’re struggling, look at your current surroundings, pick an object, and turn it into a metaphor for something. Or think of somebody in the real world (mail person, gas station attendant, etc.) and make up a secret double life for them. C’mon, you can do this.”

To the West (a villanelle poem)

watchstorm

 

I love the rain. You may have guessed.
When the warm wind begins to blow,
as the last storm tracks to the west,

desire pangs wake, cry in my chest,
as I watch these dark storm clouds go.
I prefer rain—you as my guest.

I confess I may be obsessed.
You’ve danced with me in rain—you know.
Before the storm tracks to the west,

our two bodies together pressed
will fight to stay, make time pass slow.
I love you, too. Rain may have guessed.

On the squall line, we built our nest.
though we must, we hate to let go,
Now this last storm tracks to the west

tangled in wet sheets, we’re refreshed.
storms will come back, with you, I know.
I love rain, and you, so I rest—
watching this storm track to the west.

—–

POETIC FORM:

The villanelle is a French form, consisting of five tercets and a quatrain with line lengths of 8-10 syllables. The first and third lines of the first stanza become refrains that repeat throughout the poem.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A(1)
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
a
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
a
b
A(2)
a
b
A(1)
A(2)

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a departure poem. Many people depart to school and/or work every day, and they depart on a plane, train, or automobile–some even walk or ride a bike. Of course, that’s keeping things rather physical; there are also emotional and psychological departures. You may even decide to make a departure from your normal writing style in tone or structure today.”

When It Rains (a rondel poem)

wpid-2015-04-01-10.28.41.jpg.jpeg

You take my hand, I can’t resist.
We find our haven in the storm.
I know these clouds, the way they form,
the wind that makes my passions twist.

I knew you the first time we kissed.
The sun was hot; your lips were warm.
You took my hand, could not resist.
We found our haven in the storm.

I hope for rain, though drought persists.
Still I rebel, will not conform
to rules that keep us from the storm.
I dreamed a place where we can tryst.
Come take me now, we can’t resist.

—–
POETIC FORM: Rondel
A French form, similar to the rondeau and the triolet, consisting of 13 eight-syllable lines in three stanzas.
Rhyme scheme = ABba/abAB/abbaA
—–
POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:
“For today’s prompt, write a resistance poem. There are many forms of resistance, including militant resistance, resistance to new ideas, the resistance in exercise, and maybe even a little resistance to starting a new project. I hope you don’t resist the urge to write a poem today.”

Significance on the Wind – Instagram poetry (a lai poem)

wpid-2015-03-16-16.28.42.jpg.jpeg

Significance on the Wind

such a cold Wednesday
windy, dark and gray
in March

so a curious jay
perched in fine display
o’er arch

pale pastel bouquet
sent it’s scent my way
a larch

———-

(for Emy)

(provided words:  curious, Wednesday, pastel, significance)

@ConnorPenelope on Instagram

 

POETIC FORM:

lai – 9-line poem or stanza that uses AB rhyme with this pattern: AABAABAAB. A lines use 5 syllables, B lines have 2.

Your Name — Instagram poetry (a quatern)

image
(click to enlarge)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve made an incantation of your name,
whispered it softly on a spring warm wind.
My body aches, cries for your weight again.
I’ve conjured raging storms to bring you in.

Winter has kept us two lovers estranged.
I’ve made an incantation of your name.
I’ve watched the skies, I’m waiting for a change.
I’ve raised my trembling hands within the henge.

My beating heart won’t slow its frantic pace.
My shuttered eyes are haunted by your face.
I’ve made an incantation of your name.
Tell me are gathering clouds my saving grace?

Just why my soul wants yours I can’t explain.
I’m twisted on the wind, a weather vane.
You make me sigh aloud and pray for rain.
I’ve made an incantation of your name.

———-

@ConnorPenelope on Instagram

POETIC FORM: Quatern – 16 lines broken into 4 quatrains. Each line has 8 syllables. 1st line is refrain. In 2nd stanza, refrain appears in 2nd line; 3rd stanza, 3rd line; 4th stanza, 4th (and final) line. No rhyme scheme.