Touch (a luc bat)

touch

The air flew from my chest
as though a storm undressed my heart
composure fell apart.
My pulse stuttered, restarted and
you reached to take my hand.
Upon the witness stand, the sun
watched our worlds come undone.
The touch was our first one–contained
the lightning that has chained
our souls each time it rained, and wind
that blew until the end
of reason could contend, with touch–
to burn the flesh this much.
That we could call down such great storms–
the magic love performs!
When just your hand conforms to mine,
my head swims as though wine
has filled this mouth of mine. Your eyes
are cloudy, darkened skies.
Within their depths, there lies my rest.

—–

POETIC FORM:

luc bat – (vietnamese “six-eight”) Alternating lines of 6 and 8 syllables. The rhyme scheme renews at the end of every 8-syllable line and rhymes on the 6th syllable of both lines. No set length or subject matter.

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FORM DIAGRAM:

xxxxxA
xxxxxAxB
xxxxxB
xxxxxBxC
xxxxxC
xxxxxCxD
xxxxxD
xxxxxDxA

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a moment poem. The moment can be a big moment or small moment; it can be a good moment or horrible moment; it can affect thousands or matter to just one person. Some moments happen in crowded rooms; some happen in the most quiet of spaces. Find yours and write a poem.

Flood Stage (a Triolet)

flood1

The rain keeps falling, refuses to slow–
and the water just keeps rising.
With each kiss, we know, this passion will grow.
and rain keeps falling, refuses to slow.
We’re chanting these storms in, you know?
The intensity isn’t surprising.
This rain keeps falling, refuses to slow.
and the water just keeps rising.

—–

POETIC FORM: Triolet

An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)
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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a historic poem. It could be a poem about a landmark event, specific battle, an era in time, or whatever you consider a historic happening.

My Nature

image

You may think it’s very strange
I do not long for the sun.
I can see your sad dismay,
though I don’t share your sorrow.

Keep your umbrella at hand.
Don your boots and watch the sky.
Call the weatherman to task,
when the forecast ruins your plans.

While you hope for summer days,
and this weather makes you frown,
know my soul aches for the clouds,
as my body craves the rain.

I’ve been wooed by thunder’s call
It’s my nature to be wet.
I grow restless in the calm,
because I have known the storm.

—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a nature poem. For many poets, the first thing that may pop to mind includes birds, trees, waterfalls, rivers, and such. But there’s also human nature, nature vs. nurture, and other things natural, including natural selection and being a “natural” at something. Let your nature take it where it will today

Storm Season (a somonka)

image

Storm season has come:
I’ve got my head in the clouds.
When the wind changes,
We’ll go out, tornado chase,
and find the thrill of our lives!

Spring winds spin vanes, it’s
April in Oklahoma.
Clouds are my bedsheets;
Thunder croons my lullaby–
It’s storm season, after all.

—–

POETIC FORM: Somonka

The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but it is possible to have a poet take on two personas. Click here for a refresher on the tanka.

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FORM DIAGRAM:

5-
7-
5-
7-
7-

5-
7-
5-
7-
7-
—–

POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, write a seasonal poem. This should be a snap for haiku poets; after all, inserting seasonal words is a rule for the form. However, you don’t have to write haiku to write a poem that references or happens in one of the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter. Pick a season or include them all.”

How About a Flash? (a gogyohka)

lightning (2)

cold rain particles colliding
build energy in a cloud
below magnetic energy pulls
cloud to ground a flash of heat
explosive lightning strikes

—–

POETIC FORM: GOGYOHKA

Gogyohka a Japanese form, translates literally to “five-line poem.” An off-shoot of the tanka form, the gogyohka has very simple rules: The poem is comprised of five lines with one phrase per line. A compound or complex sentence is probably too long, but phrases may be as short as one word and more than five. The theory behind gogyohka is concise lines (five lines) but free (variable line length with each phrase). No special seasonal or cutting words. No subject matter constraints. Just five lines of poetic phrases.

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

“For today’s prompt, take the phrase “How (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “How to Write a Poem,” “How Mechanical Pencils Work,” and “Howling at the Moon After Midnight in the Middle of a Thunderstorm

The Storm

freckles wind

The wind flirts, tangling
hands in my hair — you lift your
finger, test the breeze —
as I smile. “Speak to me,
weatherman, of the coming storm?”
The rain starts, pouring
Over our bodies–washing us
clean, feel the wetness–
as we collapse, whispering
“Lover, the storm indeed came!”
———-
NOTE:
Thanks to a new poet friend, the weatherman, for the response portion of this poem.

POETIC FORM: SOMONKA

The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but it is possible to have a poet take on two personas.

A refresher on the tanka: If a haiku is usually (mistakenly) thought of as a 3-line, 5-7-5 syllable poem, then the tanka would be a 5-line, 5-7-5-7-7 syllable poem. However, as with haiku, it’s better to think of a tanka as a 5-line poem with 3 short lines (lines 2, 4, 5) and 2 very short lines (lines 1 and 3).

While imagery is still important in tanka, the form is a little more conversational than haiku at times. It also allows for the use of poetic devices such as metaphor and personification (2 big haiku no-no’s). Like haiku, tanka is a Japanese poetic form.

(For more on the tanka, see: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/poetic-forms/tanka-bigger-and-more-relaxed-than-a-haiku for more on the somonka: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/somonka-poetic-forms)