The Hours

clock3

 

Sometimes they fly by like
traffic on a Friday evening highway
and sometimes they pool
at my feet like Autumn leaves
and I can’t make them
move fast enough, but I try
to remember whether the hours
with you (and the ones away)
move quickly or slowly
— each one is a gift.

—–
AUDIO FILE:

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Gears (a triolet poem)

clocks

 

“You prefer not to see the gears of the clock, as to better tell time.”

― Erin MorgensternThe Night Circus

You prefer not to see the gears of the clock
— as to better tell the time.
You guard the magic, turn a key in the lock.
You prefer not to see the gears of the clock.
You’d rather imagine, than to take full stock,
to live life with more whimsy than rhyme.
You prefer not to see the gears of the clock
— as to better tell the time.

POETIC FORM: TRIOLET
The triolet (TREE-o-LAY), has 13th century French roots linked to the rondeau or “round” poem. An 8-line poem, in which the first line is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are 3 other lines 2 of which rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.
DIAGRAM:
A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)
For more information on this form, check out Poetic Asides.

 

Raving Mad (an erasure poem)

cutitoutpoem

I suppose
I’m mad.
I haven’t
been
yet.

You’ll see
me
vanish.

Queer
things happen
while
I just turn
and

vanish
again.

After
a minute
or two
before
will be much

the most
interesting
and raving
mad–

at least
it was
as again
I wish.

appearing
and vanishing
so suddenly
make one
quite
giddy.

Beginning
with the end
and ending
some time
after.

clock (2)

 

—–

POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

—–

PROMPT:

CutItOut

To earn the “Cut It Out” badge, start with an X ACTO knife, box cutter or other cutting device. Find a text you don’t mind cutting up — or make a photocopy of the text if necessary — and physically cut out the unused portions to create an erasure poem. Watch James W. Moore’s video, “Making Heaven,” which captures his process of creating poems using this approach: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FAxSv1sZOs&list=UUMgTlLB9YpdkRZHiX3zOo3g&feature=share&index=2 Scan your completed work — or take a picture of it — and upload it to the site. Cite your source text at the bottom of your post.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE TEXT: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll