May I have a Spoon? (an out-and-about poem)

windowrain

When it rains
may I have a spoon?

I’d like to go out there
to the back yard–

Pushing at that edge,
I’ll handle the stuff.

I recommend the dozer.
It’s the same project.

The water should move
off of the highway,

redirect to the pond–
work in our direction.

The neighbor is calmed down,
he’s high — that’s what I heard.

I’m anxious –can I help,
anything else for you, for him?

Whatever they don’t take–
the rest, we’re just securing it.

Where the water comes, what is
it that’s left– and that’s not fair?

I told her last night if you can’t
excuse me today, I understand.

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POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:

AllEars

To earn the “All Ears” badge, take a public journey of your choosing. For instance, you might sit on your local bus or train for an hour, walk around the mall, visit a museum or even just walk down the street in an area with a lot of foot traffic. Keep an open ear to the conversations around you and jot down the phrases and words you overhear. Craft a poem composed of those fragments and take a picture during your journey to post alongside your poem. For examples of overheard poetry, visit Laura J. Davies’ “Overheard Poetry” page at http://cargocollective.com/laurajdavies/Overheard-Poetry. Cite the starting point and end point of your journey at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: brunch at Panera

He Did (an erasure poem)

He Did (a redacted poem)

It is a Friday,
three days after I go straight–
and I don’t know who will
walk up the street to
see the poets these days.

I go on, and he
doesn’t even look up.
I get a little ink,
but I don’t go to sleep.

I just stroll into the lane
and ask where
I came from,
in the heat.

I am sweating
and thinking of
leaning on John,
while he whispered.

He stopped.

-Pen Connor 2015

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POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

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PROMPT:

Redacted

To earn the “Redacted” badge, visit http://www.erasures.org and follow the directions to drag the blackout icon to your tool bar. From there, navigate to a website or other source text. Click on the blackout icon to activate the tool, then use your mouse to highlight words on the screen. As you highlight sections and release your mouse, you will see a black bar appear over them, digitally blacking them out. Leave only the words that comprise your poem exposed. Take a screenshot(s) of your finished product and post it to the site. To learn how to take a screenshot based on your operating system, visithttp://www.take-a-screenshot.org/. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE TEXT:

The Poetry Foundation (http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171368)
Frank O’Hara, “The Day Lady Died” from Lunch Poems. Copyright © 1964 by Frank O’Hara. Reprinted (on the Poetry Foundation site) with the permission of City Lights Books.
Source: The Collected Poems of Frank O’Hara (1995)

Umbrella (an erasure poem)

whiteoutpoem

He is surrounded by clouds.
Sheets of rain pouring down
and he dances in the wind,
shimmering and wet.

Out from the shadows,
her umbrella open
against the rain,
her gown is quickly soaked.
She is hidden.

-Pen Connor 2015

GirlUmbrellaRain

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POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

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PROMPT:

WhiteOut

To earn the White Out badge, first get your hands on a bottle of white out, a white-out pen or white paint. Find a text you don’t mind marking up — or make a photocopy of the text if necessary — and progressively cover up lines of text with white out until only the words composing your erasure poem remain visible. Scan your completed erasure as an image — or take a picture of it — and post it to the site. Note: You must complete this erasure process by hand — no digital tools allowed (you’ll do that for another badge). To see a sample white-out poem, view excerpts from Mary Ruefle’s A Little White Shadow on the Poetry Foundation’s website: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/178610. Scan or take a picture of your poem and upload it to the site. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE TEXT:  The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, page 154

Storm-Tossed (a 108 word poem)

womanboat

The moon has been pushing,
tugging my tides, of late.
My ship is tossed by a wild,
mercurial sea.

I relish these days, the fervor
and elation, but my soul longs
for the harbor that is you.

I’ve been watching brooding skies
checking charts and maps
–hoping to find my way
back to where you are.

Do you perhaps stand
at the shoreline, shining
a beacon to light
the way?

When I appear over the
the stormy horizon–
cast me a line?
Tow me to shore?

Gather me into your arms
— into your body?
Will you give me shelter,
and show me what
loving you can be?

—–

PROMPT:

108 Word Poem – Poetry challenge, inspired by The Quiet World, by Jeffrey McDaniel http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179259 – If you could only write 108 words to your lover… (167 less 59) write a poem with exactly 108 words.

Bury the Weather Vane

conjure

When you attempt to
conjure a weatherman,
be sure to wear stormy grey.
Kick off both of your shoes.
Walk for hours in the rain.
Bury the weather vane
below your bedroom window,
gather a fistful of feathers,
and slowly chant his name.
Dance boldly with the moon,
when she’s full and flirts
from behind a veil of clouds
which you have stirred
widdershins into your third
cup of black, sweet coffee
–he will come riding the wind
of your incantation.

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Bury the (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Some possible titles include: “Bury the Hatchet,” “Bury the Body,” “Bury the Past,” “Bury the Hate,” and “Bury the Acorns.”

Chemistry (a triolet)

stormeye

What is the matter in a spring rain–
hydrogen, oxygen, energy?
Would you understand, if I tried to explain?
What is the matter in a spring rain–
that makes me want you, drives me insane?
I ache to ignite that chemistry.
Need is what matters! Bring on your rain–
your hydrogen, oxygen and energy.

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POETIC FORM: Triolet
An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.
FORM DIAGRAM:
A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

Here’s the final “Two for Tuesday” prompt of the month:

1. Write a matter poem. Matter is what things are made of.
2. Write an anti-matter poem. The opposite of a matter poem.

Outbreak (a cinquain)

threetornadoes

it rains
winds gust and blow
tornadic passion storms
break out from in between my bones
it pours

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POETIC FORM:
Cnquain – five-line poetic form from Adelaide Crapsey. Inspired by tanka, the cinquain is comprised of 2 syllables in the first line, 4 in the second line, 6 in the third, 8 in the fourth, and 2 in the fifth. Plus, poets have the freedom to add or subtract one syllable from each line.
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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take a word or two invented by William Shakespeare, make it the title of your poem, and write your poem. Click here for a link to some words coined by Shakespeare, who was baptized on this date in 1564. If the link doesn’t work, here are a few: advertising, bloodstained, critic, dwindle, eyeball, hobnob, luggage, radiance, and zany. He invented more than 1,700!

Touch (a luc bat)

touch

The air flew from my chest
as though a storm undressed my heart
composure fell apart.
My pulse stuttered, restarted and
you reached to take my hand.
Upon the witness stand, the sun
watched our worlds come undone.
The touch was our first one–contained
the lightning that has chained
our souls each time it rained, and wind
that blew until the end
of reason could contend, with touch–
to burn the flesh this much.
That we could call down such great storms–
the magic love performs!
When just your hand conforms to mine,
my head swims as though wine
has filled this mouth of mine. Your eyes
are cloudy, darkened skies.
Within their depths, there lies my rest.

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POETIC FORM:

luc bat – (vietnamese “six-eight”) Alternating lines of 6 and 8 syllables. The rhyme scheme renews at the end of every 8-syllable line and rhymes on the 6th syllable of both lines. No set length or subject matter.

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FORM DIAGRAM:

xxxxxA
xxxxxAxB
xxxxxB
xxxxxBxC
xxxxxC
xxxxxCxD
xxxxxD
xxxxxDxA

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a moment poem. The moment can be a big moment or small moment; it can be a good moment or horrible moment; it can affect thousands or matter to just one person. Some moments happen in crowded rooms; some happen in the most quiet of spaces. Find yours and write a poem.

Flood Stage (a Triolet)

flood1

The rain keeps falling, refuses to slow–
and the water just keeps rising.
With each kiss, we know, this passion will grow.
and rain keeps falling, refuses to slow.
We’re chanting these storms in, you know?
The intensity isn’t surprising.
This rain keeps falling, refuses to slow.
and the water just keeps rising.

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POETIC FORM: Triolet

An 8 linepoem. The first line of the poem is used 3 times and the second line is used twice. There are only 3 other lines to write: 2 rhyme with the first line, the other rhymes with the second line.

FORM DIAGRAM:

A (first line)
B (second line)
a (rhymes with first line)
A (repeat first line)
a (rhymes with first line)
b (rhymes with second line)
A (repeat first line)
B (repeat second line)
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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a historic poem. It could be a poem about a landmark event, specific battle, an era in time, or whatever you consider a historic happening.

My Nature

image

You may think it’s very strange
I do not long for the sun.
I can see your sad dismay,
though I don’t share your sorrow.

Keep your umbrella at hand.
Don your boots and watch the sky.
Call the weatherman to task,
when the forecast ruins your plans.

While you hope for summer days,
and this weather makes you frown,
know my soul aches for the clouds,
as my body craves the rain.

I’ve been wooed by thunder’s call
It’s my nature to be wet.
I grow restless in the calm,
because I have known the storm.

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write a nature poem. For many poets, the first thing that may pop to mind includes birds, trees, waterfalls, rivers, and such. But there’s also human nature, nature vs. nurture, and other things natural, including natural selection and being a “natural” at something. Let your nature take it where it will today