Wildfire — After Christina Perri, Human (a golden shovel poem)

wildfire

The fire is in the chasing, and I’m 
burning to break free. There’s only
one remedy for being this human.
 
The road less traveled is calling and 
the sun is fading, curling at the corners.
long to run through the trees, to bleed 
the sorrow from my bones, to gasp when 
my lungs can’t swallow enough sunlight.
want to run until I find your feet, and fall 
like the last leaf, let the wind carry me down —
 
The fire is in the chasing, and I’m
burning to break free. There’s only 
one remedy for being this human.
 
 
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POETIC FORM:

golden shovel – Take a line (or lines) from a poem you like. Use each word as an end word in your poem. Keep the end words in order. Credit the original poet, ie. “-after (poet)”.

 

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POEM A DAY NOVEMBER 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, write an echo poem.
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AUDIO FILE:

Bohemian (a conceptual poem)

lantern

There are times I feel the need
to cry out in the night —
making noise fill the whole bed
with the roots of language,
the struggling impression of fury,
an owl that nightly hoots and wonders.

There are times I feel the need
to find my gypsy spirit —
Her feet never stay in my house,
foolish and unruly woman,
once free to wander aimlessly
in another part of the wood.

There are times I feel the need
to center myself —
a transfigured turbulent river,
the shadow inside me
grows faint with wandering,
longs to find the way home,
to clamber up its wooden stairs
and again greet the light.

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POETIC FORM: A conceptual Poem

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PROMPT:

OnDemand

To earn the “On Demand” badge, start by coming up with an unlikely word combination. You can make up your own, choose words at random from a source text, or use a generator like the one at JimPix (http://jimpix.co.uk/words/random-username-generator.asp) to come up with your words. Examples: Foolish Ninja, Calamitous Rock, Hurry Pork, Jugular Magnet.
Visit Google (http://www.google.com) and do a search on your chosen word combination (no quotes around the terms). Google will display a list of pages, as well as short descriptions for each site. Compose a poem using only these page titles and short descriptions — do not click into the sites themselves to grab more text. You can use multiple pages of search results if necessary. Post your poem to the site and cite your word combination at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: word combination: clamorous wandering

Panic (an out-and-about poem)

womantornadohouse

My thoughts are warning sirens
spinning faster until I lose my grip
on words that no one else has used.

I find that calm spot,
then without warning — claustrophobia.
I’m out of control again.

I’m beautiful but deadly,
swirling, whirling, snapping,
circular winds uprooting trees.

I am rain-wrapped twists and turns
a starving demon-woman
breaking glass, taking cover.

In the eerie, quiet aftermath,
of new beginning,
I feel unsettled, unknowing —

scattered           memories:
clean sheets
striped socks

a cat                    shivering
on      my lap
and debris

in
my
wake

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POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:

CrowdSource

To earn the “Crowdsource” badge, pick a public place with a lot of foot traffic. Select a concrete noun (e.g. tree, wax, mouse, window). Hold or display a sign inviting the public to contribute their definitions of the word or talk about what they think about when they hear that word; alternately, walk around and ask random people to contribute. Collect a minimum of ten definitions, and use those words to write your poem. Do not include the chosen noun anywhere in the poem’s body or title. Cite your collection method, location and chosen word at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: Facebook Friends

Ceremonial Cranes (an out-and-about poem)

crane

Ask Vitruvius about beauty,
and look at the exalted cranes–
common and blue, red and
mechanical–models of
mathematical mythology.
A thousand timeless folded,
flying roosting and rusty,
they are positioned for power–
craning necks to extend
an eternal inked invitation
to vigilance, a visit from
Hiroshima, a ceremonial
origami celebration that
square by square calls out,
“Be here. Be. Here.”
with gregarious vocabulary,
in Tulsa, Oklahoma or
welcome, wherever you are.

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POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:
OffTheShelf

To earn the “Off the Shelf” badge, head to your local library or bookstore, making a mental note of things you see on your journey there — you might, for instance, see construction taking place, drive by a used car dealership, pass a printing shop or spot a group of birds  in the trees. Make one of the things you saw your research topic for the day and find five books related to that topic in your library or bookstore’s stacks. Compose a poem using only the words and phrases  found on the first five pages of each text, excluding introductory matter. Make a note of your sources and include the citations along with your completed poem. ( I used websites, and only words from the main page in each case.)
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCES:

Topic – Cranes

Umbrella (an erasure poem)

whiteoutpoem

He is surrounded by clouds.
Sheets of rain pouring down
and he dances in the wind,
shimmering and wet.

Out from the shadows,
her umbrella open
against the rain,
her gown is quickly soaked.
She is hidden.

-Pen Connor 2015

GirlUmbrellaRain

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POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

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PROMPT:

WhiteOut

To earn the White Out badge, first get your hands on a bottle of white out, a white-out pen or white paint. Find a text you don’t mind marking up — or make a photocopy of the text if necessary — and progressively cover up lines of text with white out until only the words composing your erasure poem remain visible. Scan your completed erasure as an image — or take a picture of it — and post it to the site. Note: You must complete this erasure process by hand — no digital tools allowed (you’ll do that for another badge). To see a sample white-out poem, view excerpts from Mary Ruefle’s A Little White Shadow on the Poetry Foundation’s website: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/178610. Scan or take a picture of your poem and upload it to the site. Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE TEXT:  The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, page 154

Storm-Tossed (a 108 word poem)

womanboat

The moon has been pushing,
tugging my tides, of late.
My ship is tossed by a wild,
mercurial sea.

I relish these days, the fervor
and elation, but my soul longs
for the harbor that is you.

I’ve been watching brooding skies
checking charts and maps
–hoping to find my way
back to where you are.

Do you perhaps stand
at the shoreline, shining
a beacon to light
the way?

When I appear over the
the stormy horizon–
cast me a line?
Tow me to shore?

Gather me into your arms
— into your body?
Will you give me shelter,
and show me what
loving you can be?

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PROMPT:

108 Word Poem – Poetry challenge, inspired by The Quiet World, by Jeffrey McDaniel http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179259 – If you could only write 108 words to your lover… (167 less 59) write a poem with exactly 108 words.

Bury the Weather Vane

conjure

When you attempt to
conjure a weatherman,
be sure to wear stormy grey.
Kick off both of your shoes.
Walk for hours in the rain.
Bury the weather vane
below your bedroom window,
gather a fistful of feathers,
and slowly chant his name.
Dance boldly with the moon,
when she’s full and flirts
from behind a veil of clouds
which you have stirred
widdershins into your third
cup of black, sweet coffee
–he will come riding the wind
of your incantation.

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Bury the (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Some possible titles include: “Bury the Hatchet,” “Bury the Body,” “Bury the Past,” “Bury the Hate,” and “Bury the Acorns.”

Outbreak (a cinquain)

threetornadoes

it rains
winds gust and blow
tornadic passion storms
break out from in between my bones
it pours

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POETIC FORM:
Cnquain – five-line poetic form from Adelaide Crapsey. Inspired by tanka, the cinquain is comprised of 2 syllables in the first line, 4 in the second line, 6 in the third, 8 in the fourth, and 2 in the fifth. Plus, poets have the freedom to add or subtract one syllable from each line.
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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take a word or two invented by William Shakespeare, make it the title of your poem, and write your poem. Click here for a link to some words coined by Shakespeare, who was baptized on this date in 1564. If the link doesn’t work, here are a few: advertising, bloodstained, critic, dwindle, eyeball, hobnob, luggage, radiance, and zany. He invented more than 1,700!

My Heart, the Weather Vane (a shadorma)

weathervane

heart on sleeve
I dance in the wind
twist and turn
lightning rod
and yet I’m still the first to
get wet when it rains

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POETIC FORM:

Shadorma – a Spanish 6-line syllabic poem of 3/5/3/3/7/5 syllable lines respectively.

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FORM DIAGRAM:

3-
5-
3-
3-
7-
5-

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “My (blank), the (blank),” replace the blanks with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “My Dentist, the Torture Expert,” “My Lunch, the Thing I Got Out of the Vending Machine,” “My Father, the Comedian,” or “My Life, the Punchline.”