Brillig Nonsense (a chance operation poem)

jabberwocky1

jabberwocky1 (2)

Jabberwocky2

 

Chortled borogroves,
Jabberwock galumphing
Jabberwock manxome

arms snicker through the outgrabe
whiffling, “Beware! ” Did wabe were blade
borogroves, long frabjous, went raths.

That bandersnatch back
—————–Callooh Tumtum
His sought stood brillig
————— Jabberwock

Mimsy outgrabe mome, dead Jubjub
and slain frumious two — that head with sword.
Toves burbled, did.

‘Twas all came and went
were through claws
and he gimble
——-— mimsy, slithy —
and the snack gimble.
‘Twas come uffish toves
———–catch rested time.

Callay and vorpal, through brillig thought,
stood tulgey, and took, and slithy mome.
Hand thou flame, and jaws the thought!

He beamish wood, with the vorpal and eyes,
gyre and wabe awhile all raths
Boy, beware to shun the gyre!

So by the came of he the one
My, my — bite one
———–— the joy!

And the to bird tree left his day.
In foe, the in, the hast, the O
————————My son.

 

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POETIC FORM: A Chance Operation Poem

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PROMPT:

ShakeItUp

 

To earn the “Shake It Up” badge, follow the mandate ofTristanTzara in “How to MakeaDadaist Poem” (http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/tzara.html) to create a cut-up poem. Start by  cutting out desired words or phrases from a source text, and put them in a paper bag or other container. Shake the container to mix up the words, then pull them out one by one. Place them on the table in the order you draw them to create your poem — no removing or reordering words permitted. Post your poem — or a picture of your cut-up if possible — on the site, along with a source text citation.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE:

Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

A Rock ‘n’ Roll Love (a conceptual poem)

rocknroll

Love’s energy derives not
from the variable tension
between man and woman
but from the variety of rhythmic
patterns within the man,
the different patterns
playing off the steady beat
of the repeated phrase.

Both loves depend,
as all loves do,
on the interplay of what
changes with what stays
the same — the simultaneous
creation and disruption of pattern.

But the differences ought to feel
as prominent as the similarities:
everything about
the fluctuating relationship
of woman and man in free sex
applies equally well to blank sex.

Attention to the man tends to
undermine a narrow preference
for one or another form of love,
for if you can hear what
man is doing to your experience
of the woman in a free-sex love,
then you can hear what man
is doing in a metered love.

The earliest surviving love
in the Western tradition
is organized in men.
Tellingly, it was not always
written down in men,
a fact that reminds us
that man is ultimately
a sonic rather than a visual
element of love.

As love began to be written
in vernacular languages,
the addition of rock ‘n’ roll
to the man seemed
to many people a barbarity.

When Milton was writing
Paradise Lost in blank sex,
the deletion of rock ‘n’ roll
from man seemed to some

people equally barbarous.
What does the addition
of rock ‘n’ roll do to
our sense of the man’s
relationship to woman?

In what way does rock ‘n’ roll
alert us to the work
that all men, rock ‘n’ rolled
or un-rock ‘n’ rolled, metered
or un-metered, end-stopped
or enjambed are performing
in relation to woman?

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POETIC FORM: A Conceptual Poem

—–

PROMPT:

SubTexter

 

To earn the “Substitute Texter” badge, choose a source text where key terms reappear frequently throughout it. Books on a particular subject (e.g., whaling, basketball, the Civil War) lend themselves easily to this prompts, as do textbooks, medical journals, etc. Fiction is harder, but we welcome you to challenge yourself! Choose 1-5 of these recurring terms. For instance, in a source text about chess, you might choose the words “pawn” and “board.” Next, for each word you’ve chosen, select a replacement word. In the example above, you might choose to replace “pawn” with “woman” and “board” with “home.” Substitute the replacement  word(s) on your list each time the original term(s) appear(s) in the text.  Create a poem from the results, keeping editing and authorial intervention to a minimum. Post your poem on the site, along with a source text citation and a note on your seed and replacement words.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: The Art of the Poetic Line by James Longenbach – pp. 18-19

Seed Words and Replacements:
poem – love
line – man
syntax – woman
verse – sex
rhyme – rock ‘n’ roll

An Invitation to Dance (an out-and-about poem)

dance 2

 

Will you call me, asking yourself —
if you give way, how will you
cross the days to get to
the clean years, yourself?
Are you wise, and will you work
to earn the joy you get?
Will you move mostly of free will?
Music will find you moving,
an art in this world.
a boy with an honest face for heat,
and an eye for beautiful need,
Will you join in the dance?
Will you show yourself
in the painting you make?
Will you live, in rivers,
rent room in a ramble house?
A silent something need not
welcome the whole collection.
Waltz in time with the water
and free yourself, will you?

—–

POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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PROMPT:

AsAdvertised

 

To earn the “As Advertised” badge, locate a community bulletin board — try places like a library, coffee shop or university campus. Create a poem using only words found on the posters and fliers. Take a picture of the bulletin board to post alongside your poem.

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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson,  is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE:

words:
a acceleration affordable all allowed American an and annual any apartment approximately art arts as asking at auction available bags beautiful been beginners bi-weekly box boxes boy brush builders by call camp candy canning car cargo carpentry celebration cell children chords clean cleaning cleanings clean-up clerks collection college community competed complete completed condition contact converts cross dance day days design digital display distribute doors drive drop-in drywall earn engineering enter estate excellent expanses expertise eye face fall families farm featuring feed fencing finishes flower foods for framing free Friday front fully fund-raiser funds gas gelding get give giveaways glide good great group harvest has hauling heat help hike home honest hour house how hull hunters imaging in included info interior it it’s items Japanese jobs join joy junk kayak large lasting library live long lots making manual manufacturing martial me meeting mileage mills model Monday moose more mostly move moving much music name nearly need never new not now nursery of office on one-time only organics organize our over owner paddle painter painting part perfect person pet’s plastic popular power price print prize professional prompt public quality queen raffle ramble rates reason references refreshments reliable rent repair rest rivers room sage sale Saturday school season serving session show silent size sleep small sofa something space spirits spring stroke studio Sunday sunny support swift sword technique the their this thoroughbred through tiling time tire to town traditional trailer transmission treat truck turf two upper use valley very viewing waltz washing water way we Wednesday week weekly welcome west wheel whole will window windows wise with work workshop world years you yourself zone
board (2)

Panic (an out-and-about poem)

womantornadohouse

My thoughts are warning sirens
spinning faster until I lose my grip
on words that no one else has used.

I find that calm spot,
then without warning — claustrophobia.
I’m out of control again.

I’m beautiful but deadly,
swirling, whirling, snapping,
circular winds uprooting trees.

I am rain-wrapped twists and turns
a starving demon-woman
breaking glass, taking cover.

In the eerie, quiet aftermath,
of new beginning,
I feel unsettled, unknowing —

scattered           memories:
clean sheets
striped socks

a cat                    shivering
on      my lap
and debris

in
my
wake

—–

POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

—–

PROMPT:

CrowdSource

To earn the “Crowdsource” badge, pick a public place with a lot of foot traffic. Select a concrete noun (e.g. tree, wax, mouse, window). Hold or display a sign inviting the public to contribute their definitions of the word or talk about what they think about when they hear that word; alternately, walk around and ask random people to contribute. Collect a minimum of ten definitions, and use those words to write your poem. Do not include the chosen noun anywhere in the poem’s body or title. Cite your collection method, location and chosen word at the bottom of your post.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE: Facebook Friends

Cherry Bomb (an out-and-about poem)

cherry street hideaway

a favorite
dotted blue
scoop dress

filled to
half- hide
heaping hills

tossed over a bed
made this farmer’s
head shake

melted this
frozen heart

made red
cherry bomb
magic

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POETIC FORM: An out-and-about Poem

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OrdersUp

To earn the “Order’s Up” badge, visit your local restaurant, bar or coffee shop and snag a copy of the menu. Write a poem using only words and phrases found on the menu. Get a picture of yourself taken sitting in the location to post alongside your poem (selfies allowed for the less intrepid). Cite your restaurant, bar or coffee shop name and location at the bottom of your post.
—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE: The Hideaway (Hideaway Pizza), Cherry Street, Tulsa, OK

The F Word (a remixing poem – tanka)

surprisegirl

Certainly the word
burns — a bawdy vulgar imp:
part of a couplet,
there in a poem, striking
the senses as “fucking” does.

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POETIC FORM: A Remixing Poem (A Tanka)

A Japanese form, tanka would be a 5-line, 5-7-5-7-7 syllable poem, or a 5-line poem with 3 short lines (lines 2, 4, 5) and 2 very short lines (lines 1 and 3). While imagery is important in tanka, the form is a little more conversational than haiku. It allows for the use of poetic devices such as metaphor and personification.
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PROMPT:

To earn the Pinch an Inch badge, begin with a source text of your choice and a ruler. Mark off a column of text one vertical inch wide down one or more pages — you might choose, for example, to use an inch down the center of your page, or along the page’s left or right margin. Craft your poem using only words located within your vertical column inch(es).
If you decide to use multiple pages, locate your vertical column inch in the same location on each page (i.e. all center columns, all right margin columns, etc).
Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.

—–

PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

—–

SOURCE TEXT: The F Word – edited by Jesse Sheidlower

You’re Not (a lai)

sunhat

You showed me passion–
jealous of the sun,
you fought.

Stormy attraction,
You wooed, till love won–
I thought.

Then we came undone.
I’m here in the sun.
You’re not.

—–

POETIC FORM:

The lai is another French form. It’s a nine-line poem or stanza that uses an “a” and “b” rhyme following this pattern: aabaabaab. The lines with an “a” rhyme use 5 syllables; the “b” rhyme lines have 2 syllables.

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FORM DIAGRAM:

a(5)
a(5)
b(2)

a(5)
a(5)
b(2)

a(5)
a(5)
b(2)

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POEM A DAY APRIL 2015 – PROMPT:

For today’s prompt, we’re dealing with our third “Two for Tuesday” prompt(s):

1. Write a “what you are” poem, or…
2. Write a “what you are not” poem.

For instance, you may be a teacher, a student, brave, scared, a person, an animal, a plant, and well, wherever this one takes you. Or not, of course.

The Storm

freckles wind

The wind flirts, tangling
hands in my hair — you lift your
finger, test the breeze —
as I smile. “Speak to me,
weatherman, of the coming storm?”
The rain starts, pouring
Over our bodies–washing us
clean, feel the wetness–
as we collapse, whispering
“Lover, the storm indeed came!”
———-
NOTE:
Thanks to a new poet friend, the weatherman, for the response portion of this poem.

POETIC FORM: SOMONKA

The somonka is a Japanese form. In fact, it’s basically two tankas written as two love letters to each other (one tanka per love letter). This form usually demands two authors, but it is possible to have a poet take on two personas.

A refresher on the tanka: If a haiku is usually (mistakenly) thought of as a 3-line, 5-7-5 syllable poem, then the tanka would be a 5-line, 5-7-5-7-7 syllable poem. However, as with haiku, it’s better to think of a tanka as a 5-line poem with 3 short lines (lines 2, 4, 5) and 2 very short lines (lines 1 and 3).

While imagery is still important in tanka, the form is a little more conversational than haiku at times. It also allows for the use of poetic devices such as metaphor and personification (2 big haiku no-no’s). Like haiku, tanka is a Japanese poetic form.

(For more on the tanka, see: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/poetic-forms/tanka-bigger-and-more-relaxed-than-a-haiku for more on the somonka: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/somonka-poetic-forms)

A Change in the Weather (a Terzanelle poem)

barometer

I felt it when you smiled with your eyes,
an unexpected change in the weather —
a shifting in the grey and winter skies.

I noticed as we sipped our tea together,
the scent of wind and ozone on your skin,
clouded with the coming change in weather.

Your clever tease, my blush and mild chagrin
they set my pulse to flight like startled birds.
I smelled the wind and ozone on your skin.

Our kindred appetites for rhyme and words
caught up in frozen time, melted it seems.
darted between us quick, like winging birds.

My laughter flowed with yours in steady streams —
the jealous sun arrested in his climb,
slowed time to stare at us a while, it seems

You kindled curiosity sublime.
Your smile persistent, slipped into my eyes.
Though pale, the sun grew quicker in his climb —
I left you, warmed beneath the winter skies.

__________

POETIC FORM: TERZANELLE

The Terzanelle combines the lyricism of Terza Rima with the repetition of the Villanelle, in 19 lines.Traditionally lines should be written in a consistient iambic meter.  The rhyme and refrain order is as follows:

A1
B
A2

b
C
B

c
D
C

d
E
D

e
F
E

f
A1
F
A2

For more information, see: Robert Lee Brewer’s Poetic Asides blog post on the Terzanelle.

Maybe, Maybe Not (a shadorma)

glasses

I don’t know.
It may be half full.
Can you tell?
Maybe not–
You never know with glasses;
I need a new pair.

ABOUT:

Today is a Tuesday, and you know what that means: Two for Tuesday Prompts! Write one, write the other, and/or write both!
•Write an optimistic poem. The glass is half full.
•Write a pessimistic poem. The glass is half empty.

POETIC FORM: SHADORMA

Shadorma is a Spanish 6-line syllabic poem of 3/5/3/3/7/5 syllable lines respectively.

LINK TO PROMPT:

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2014-april-pad-challenge-day-22