Blues (a #NaPoMo #APRPAD rondeau poem)

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I do not want to write today.
I want to sit. I want to sigh.
I want to watch the world go by,
to watch the rain and here to stay–

at this table, in this café,
and nibble on a slice of pie.
I do not want to write today.
I want to sit. I want to sigh.

I will not mourn, nor will I cry.
It’s not that I am sad that way.
My muse has gone outside to play,
and I am left here, warm and dry.
So, I will write another day.

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#NaPoMo INFO:

Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #10:

For today’s prompt, pick an emotion, make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles might include: “Happy,” “Sad,” “Angry,” or well, there’s a universe of emotions out there.

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http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-10

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POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

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AUDIO FILE:

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How Poetry Goes (What She Said) – a #NaPoMo #APRPAD Rondeau

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Some days it’s how poetry goes.
“Hey, don’t sweat it!” That’s what she said.
Write six lines, then eat jam with bread.
Second guess the rhyme scheme you chose.

Count your syllables, like they’re crows —
put on your sweater. Make your bed.
Some days it’s how poetry goes.
“Go for a walk.” That’s what she said.

“Embrace your whims, and juxtapose.”
Swap out ink for pencil, instead.
Sip your coffee, then scratch your head.
It’s a dance, every poet knows —
Most days, it’s how poetry goes.

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#NaPoMo INFO:
Poetic Asides #April Poem-A-Day Challenge – PAD #2:

For today’s prompt, write a what he said and/or what she said poem. Maybe he or she said a rumor; maybe he or she gave directions; or maybe he or she said something that made absolutely no sense at all. I don’t know what they said; rather, each poet is tasked with revealing that knowledge. http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2016-april-pad-challenge-day-2

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POETIC FORM INFO:
The poetic form focus for my PAD 2016 Challenge is the Rondeau — 13 lines in 3 stanzas; rhyme scheme: ABba/abAB/abbaA (uppercase letters are refrains) Usually 8 syllables per line. For info: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/personal-updates/help-me-rondeau-help-help-me-rondeau-another-french-poetic-form

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AUDIO FILE:

I am the Hollow

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My flesh is a bowl
— words dripping
from the brim.

I am the place
where words breathe,
beat as a pumping heart.

I am a cavern —
empty, and full of
echoes and bodies,

spilling out words.
They cry in pain,
dance in celebration.

I am where words go
— to mingle, and to flirt
— to kiss, and to fuck.

I am the hollow,
and I am the spoon,
dipping out language.

I am white linen —
a bed dampened
by the sweat of ink.

I am the cup —
words — the elixir,
the heat and the cool,

from which a soul sips
reason or rhyme–
sometimes both.

I am the sanctuary
where verses pray,
incantations rising.

I watch them slip through
cracked, stained glass
— a poem taking wing.

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AUDIO FILE:

Give Me Stories (an erasure poem)

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Tonight I walked to dinner.
I found a book of short poems
called “stories”.
What did it feel like?

Why this night everything?
I can recall each face,
mouth, hand groping
for a wallet.

I feel sentimental I flounder
in my own pleasure.
It’s something private, inside-out
–not mine any longer.

It’s as close as every detail–
the grain of the bread,
the tall clear bottle.
Locate the muscle throb.

What beat makes love,
carries us into the center?
A narrator tears up the page–
smoldering moments banging
in his bones. What is asked?

You lose everything writing.
We will die best, used up.
Are you willing to give–
to surrender– drop that old
yellow coat and give me stories.

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POETIC FORM: An Erasure Poem

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PROMPT:

OpenBook

To earn the Open Book badge, choose a book or magazine as your source text. Select a two-page spread, and scan through the text, copying down any interesting words and phrases in the order you encounter them on the page. When you’ve finished, write a poem using only these words and phrases without changing their order. No non-found words may be included in your poem. Poems should be presented in type, similar to a standard poem, and not contain additional visual elements or emphasis (you’ll do that for other badges). Credit your source text at the bottom of your post.
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PoMoSco (Poetry Month Scouts)
Found Poetry Review’s 2015 National Poetry Month Project

– April 2015 – 213 poets joined together as a troop to earn digital merit badges for completing experimental and found poetry prompts.
– Prompts are divided into five categories – remixing, erasure, out and about, conceptual and chance operation.
– Each category offers six distinct badges to be earned.
– Poets choose their own source text.
– For more information, check out pomosco.com.

A dear friend and fabulous poet, Von Thompson, is a participant. When she told me about the challenge, I decided to play along at home.

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SOURCE TEXT: Old Friend from Far Away – The Practice of Writing Memoir by Natalie Goldberg